Nazis then, now and America’s response

I hear about groups carrying signs and calling other groups Nazis and racists [“Rally in Virginia turns violent,” News, Aug. 13].

I’m 92. I fought the Germans in World War II and remained in Germany for more than two years afterward, helping wipe out the Nazis. Before people use that term, I have to ask, have they ever interrogated a real Nazi? Or been in a Nazi extermination camp? I have.

Unless you can answer yes to these questions, you don’t have the right to use this word against another human. Many of those who call others Nazis are using the same tactics that brought the real Nazis to power: preventing opposing views to be aired or trading reason for force.

Gene Leavy, East Northport

Editor’s note: The writer served in the 100th Infantry Division.

I know a resolution proposed by some Democrats in Congress to censure President Donald Trump over his response to the violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, is not likely to pass.

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I understand that even if it did pass, it would only be a symbolic gesture. However, this should be an issue that unites us all as Americans.

Censure is a strong rebuke that would send a message that hate has no home in America, that hate should not be politicized, that there were no “very fine people” among the white supremacists in Charlottesville shouting the Nazi chant “blood and soil” and “Jews will not replace us.”

Eve Krief, Centerport

Thanks to LIRR — and not so much

Now that the “summer of hell” has concluded, everyone is back to criticizing the Long Island Rail Road [“The LIRR will return to normal? Uh-oh,” Letters, Sept. 1].

As a commuter who’s been riding the railroad for 38 years, I have something different to say. To the men and women who run the LIRR, I say thanks. Thank you for getting me to and from work every day, and for the most part, on time.

The LIRR is far from perfect, and I’ve had my share of horror stories. But those moments are in the minority. Given the choice of driving or riding, I’ll take the ride every time.

Vincent O’Neill, Massapequa Park

There is no cause for celebration over a 93 percent on-time performance [“MTA: LIRR changes will stick,” News, Aug. 31]. The numbers are rigged.

A train arriving within 5 minutes and 59 seconds of its schedule is considered on time. For many Long Island Rail Road commuters who must arrive at work on time, six minutes late will not make the boss happy.

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Larry Penner, Great Neck

Lawmakers must stop the annoying robocalls

During a recent 3-week vacation, I was bombarded with robocalls on my cellphone [“Put a stop to harassing robocalls,” Letters, Aug. 29]. Because of the time difference in Europe, the calls came in all day and even at 2 and 4 a.m. It was infuriating because I needed to keep the phone on. When I got home, my answering machine was filled with these robo messages.

I recently called the New York attorney general’s office to complain and was advised to call the Federal Communications Commission. The FCC opened a file, gave me a case number, and told me to keep track of the phone numbers and send them in so the agency can investigate.

I also was advised to check the FCC website for information about robocalls, and a site called NoMoreRobocalls.com. I can only hope that with continued pressure, politicians will be bothered enough to institute fines and pass legislation to stop these calls that have become such an invasion and quality-of-life issue.

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Genie Weisman, Patchogue

Prevent the flooding in Lindenhurst

Kudos to officials in Lindenhurst for their plans to safeguard the village from destruction by floods [“$5.8M sought from U.S. for flood plans,” News, Aug. 30]. I’ve been pushing for years for an improvement to the bulkhead at the end of Fourth Street. Every time we have a substantial rain, the water moves up the street.

Jessie Nelson, Lindenhurst