“[Andrew Jackson] was really angry that he saw what was happening with regard to the Civil War; he said, ‘There’s no reason for this’ . . . Why was there the Civil War? Why could that one not have been worked out?” — President Donald Trump, in Sirius XM radio interview broadcast May 1, 2017

 

Here are other history-related statements by the president you may have missed:

George Washington was really angry when he saw what was happening with regard to the War of 1812. Why could that one not have been worked out? And we lost a few battles to Canada. Sad!

Thomas Jefferson knew there was no reason for the Mexican-American War. So he said, guys, let’s work out a deal! I do great deals, all the time.

I already told you about Andrew Jackson and the Civil War. He was very tough, a great guy. He’s getting recognized more and more, I notice, just like Frederick Douglass.

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George Custer was a complete disaster in the Indian wars. I like winners more. Little Big Horn? Biggest Loser!

Abraham Lincoln didn’t like the Spanish-American War. He said, guys, who needs the Philippines? They have a very strong leader now.

Teddy Roosevelt marched up San Juan Hill. But I own a house in Beverly Hills. Just saying.

Lincoln was against World War I, too. And he was a Republican. Who knew?

World War II was a total disaster. We did a deal with Stalin, and he ate our lunch. Very strong leader, like Russia’s Vladimir Putin.

In the Korean War, Kim Il-Sung was very tough, a very smart cookie. I would be honored to meet him, under the right circumstances.

Franklin Roosevelt wanted to stop the Vietnam War, but he was already dead. Some of my red “Make America Great Again” hats were made in Vietnam. Really.

George W. Bush invaded Iraq, which is next to Turkey. The Turks have a very strong leader, too.

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Barack Obama took us out of Afghanistan too quickly. And people are saying he was born in Indonesia. I keep hearing that, all the time.

 

Jonathan Zimmerman teaches education and history at the University of Pennsylvania. He is the author (with Emily Robertson) of “The Case for Contention: Teaching Controversial Issues in American Schools.”