It surprises me that with the abundant technology and academic tools that we experience so much negative feedback when it comes to anthropogenic (man-made) climate change [“Global warming cartoon irritates,” Letters, Dec. 23].

I would like to present the thousands of peer-reviewed articles from experts in the field of climate and environmental sciences that are in agreement. I can also support this on a personal level with my experience in achieving a degree in environmental and atmospheric Sciences.

It’s crucial to raise the fact that climate change is not just a general warming but an overall alteration of the Earth’s atmospheric systems — circulation and amount of heat being displaced on the surface — that causes these changes. One of the most important pieces evidence to support my opinion is the “hockey stick graph,” which clearly shows the correlation of carbon dioxide emissions with the use of fossil fuels that generate this heat-trapping gas.

It has been shown that, even with the uncertainty level, human-induced emissions surpass the natural sources responsible for this change of climate. As we continue to emit more gases, that causes unintentional reactions. For example, rises in land and ocean temperatures can release other harmful gases like methane, which is 30 times more potent than carbon dioxide.

Jonny Puglia

Holtsville

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There are many things that need to be done to stop or decrease the effects of global warming. I agree with Bill Gates that we must increase spending to develop clean-energy technology to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. That may be difficult considering that many economies, especially the United States, may not want to spend more money.

The efforts proposed by President Barack Obama are necessary to fix this increasing problem. He won’t be able to leave the legacy he wants if he cannot convince Congress to work well and compromise. They need to work together to make the changes we all want.

Vanessa Perryman

Hempstead

It surprises me that with the abundant technology and academic tools that we experience so much negative feedback when it comes to anthropogenic (man-made) climate change [“Global warming cartoon irritates,” Letters, Dec. 23].

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I would like to present the thousands of peer-reviewed articles from experts in the field of climate and environmental sciences that are in agreement. I can also support this on a personal level with my experience in achieving a degree in environmental and atmospheric Sciences.

It’s crucial to raise the fact that climate change is not just a general warming but an overall alteration of the Earth’s atmospheric systems — circulation and amount of heat being displaced on the surface — that causes these changes. One of the most important pieces evidence to support my opinion is the “hockey stick graph,” which clearly shows the correlation of carbon dioxide emissions with the use of fossil fuels that generate this heat-trapping gas.

It has been shown that, even with the uncertainty level, human-induced emissions surpass the natural sources responsible for this change of climate. As we continue to emit more gases, that causes unintentional reactions. For example, rises in land and ocean temperatures can release other harmful gases like methane, which is 30 times more potent than carbon dioxide.

Jonny Puglia

Holtsville

advertisement | advertise on newsday

n

There are many things that need to be done to stop or decrease the effects of global warming. I agree with Bill Gates that we must increase spending to develop clean-energy technology to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. That may be difficult considering that many economies, especially the United States, may not want to spend more money.

The efforts proposed by President Barack Obama are necessary to fix this increasing problem. He won’t be able to leave the legacy he wants if he cannot convince Congress to work well and compromise. They need to work together to make the changes we all want.

Vanessa Perryman

Hempstead