As a retired teacher and professor emeritus of Molloy College, I find it unacceptable that Hillary Clinton was given debate questions in advance [“CNN, Brazile part ways over debate emails,” News, Nov. 1].

Donna Brazile, interim chair of the Democratic National Committee, told the Clinton campaign about questions relating to contaminated water in Flint, Michigan, and the death penalty when she was a CNN commentator.

We’ve also recently learned that Donald Trump may have been tipped off by Fox News executives about a pointed question Megyn Kelly planned to ask during a debate about his demeaning comments about women.

Students in our schools get an F when caught with test answers in their possession. What example do we teach students when someone running for our highest office cheats?

Charles F. Howlett, West Islip

 

As a professor of communications, including public speaking, when assigning debates I instill in my students the need to speak from a well-researched, organized outline, maintain diplomacy, display credibility and practice.

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I am in a quandary after this presidential election.

During debates, Donald Trump spouted unresearched remarks; organization and any trace of diplomacy appeared absent. He bullied his way through the Republican debates, then threw disrespectful jibes at Hillary Clinton during the presidential debates. His performance highlighted his lack of practice.

Plagiarism is also frowned upon in speech-giving, yet Melania Trump plagiarized her way through her Republican convention speech, quoting from Michelle Obama’s 2008 Democratic convention speech. College students are expelled for such antics.

What message does this send to our children and to all Americans? Diligence is defunct!

Barbara Anne Kirshner, Miller Place