Letter: Don't judge all nursing homes

Medford Multicare Center for Living is accused of Medford Multicare Center for Living is accused of putting its most vulnerable residents at risk with "reckless cuts of medication, staff and supplies," even causing death, state Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman said in a civil suit filed Monday, Feb. 11, 2014. Photo Credit: James Carbone

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The recent tragedy at Medford Multicare Center has left a community devastated ["Lax oversight of nursing homes," Opinion, March 21]. Confidence in the nursing home -- and indeed in the care afforded many of its residents -- is tattered and understandably shaken.

This disaster has cast a dark shadow over the entire nursing home industry, but while the incident points to catastrophic mismanagement, it is important to remember that one bad apple does not necessarily spoil the bunch.

We cannot lose sight of the fact that many nursing homes on Long Island provide impeccable services.

I oversee the day-to-day duties of caring, hardworking folks who show up each day prepared to make a difference. My staff members choose to work in the nursing home because they are good at relieving pain, tending to injuries, lending an ear, and most important, being compassionate. These are noble pursuits.

Nurses, nursing assistants, porters, dietary aides, and the entire nursing home staff bring empathy and selflessness to their work.

Jill Smoller, Glen Cove

Editor's note: The writer is the administrator of the Glen Cove Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation.

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