Neighborhood fireworks create suffering

As I write this in mid-July, I’m still hearing fireworks. I heard them every day for a week leading up to Independence Day. On that day, the fireworks were so strong that they shook my house. The chair I sat in vibrated, and I could not hear the TV.

I love fireworks as much as the next person when they are set off by professionals over a huge river. But our homes in Long Island neighborhoods are very close to each other. The noise and vibrations are way over the top. For every person watching and cheering them on, there are many who are very agitated.

Do people who set these off ever consider the crying babies, stressed-out adults, veterans who find these sounds too familiar, elderly people, people with chronic conditions — in other words, their neighbors? Will the people clean up messes fireworks left in driveways? Will they clean neighbors’ carpets of messes left by scared dogs and cats? I don’t think so.

Roberta Comerchero, Commack

Why New York is falling behind other states

The origin of New York’s nickname as the “Seat of the Empire” is disputed, but its stature in the past was not. It was a center of commerce and trade universally envied in the United States. Americans from across the continent spoke of its wonders for more than two centuries, deeming its largest city the place where dreams come true.

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Lately, however, New York State is in a state of decrepitude, with hyperactive politicians and intrusive policies driving the population down and innovation out. Although advertisements tout a business climate unrivaled across the nation, high tax rates — personal, sales and corporate — stifle the very principles that made New York. States including Florida and Texas levy virtually no state taxes on income, and the Empire State has fallen as a hub of business and commerce.

As Albany grows from the excessive taxation of its populace, the state as a whole will fall behind other regions. Our government has ceased to represent the needs and desires of New Yorkers, and the economic decline of our state reflects that fact.

Christopher Condon, Manorville

Mount Sinai doesn’t need pricey condos

Does Mount Sinai really need another senior housing development? Mount Sinai Meadows and Pond View Estates are under discussion. My home is directly behind the latter. This is a 91-condo project that is planned about 100 feet from my home and close to the other eight homes on my block. Is this necessary? The noise, traffic and mess are not wanted here.

This project will take time to complete, and we will suffer in the meanwhile. The developers also are showing no concern for wildlife that inhabits this property. What senior citizen do you know who can afford a $600,000 condo? We deserve peace and quiet in our community.

Barbara Fonte, Mount Sinai