I’m writing to express my distress about the I-STOP law — Internet System for Tracking Over-Prescribing Act — spearheaded by state Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman and enacted in 2012 [“Prescription for change,” News, March 27]. The law’s electronic prescribing rules, which went into effect last month, are far-reaching for the average patient.

At my physician’s office, I was told I must provide my prescription coverage details. I didn’t have that information at the time to give. My health care plan offers mail-away or pick up options for filling prescriptions. I choose the option depending on the urgency and my willingness to pay. Often, I may leave my doctor’s office with six prescriptions, but I may decide to fill only two or three.

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Because of this new law, all prescriptions will be electronically and automatically filled, and I will be responsible for the cost. I believe this will cause local pharmacies to be bombarded with refused prescriptions and questions. This will be a nightmare for the pharmacies, patients and insurance carriers.

Rosemarie Scala

Merrick