Newsday rightly noted that the January increase in first-class postal rates won't cure the Postal Service's problems ["Postal Service rate hike won't fix longterm woes," Editorial, Dec. 27]. The Postal Service lost $16 billion in 2012, and the handling of retiree medical benefits adds to the difficulty.

Unmentioned, however, was a blockbuster reason for these continued annual losses. Each day, the mail we receive consists largely of unsolicited advertising, letters from thousands of allegedly nonprofit organizations, many of them asking for money, and an assortment of other junk mail. Postage stamps appear on almost none of this.

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Recently, for example, I received a request from a charity in Nome, Alaska, and its envelope had all of 9.2 cents postage on it.

If the rates on first-class postage can be repeatedly raised, why can't rates on the real problem, junk mail, also be raised?

James E. Stubenrauch, Massapequa