As a nurse educator, I read with interest "Nursing school gets OK" [News, July 21], about New York State's approval of a program for the preparation of nurse practitioners.

However, I was taken aback by the description of this as "advanced training," as opposed to advanced education and training. Training is, indeed, important in developing technical and practical skills.

advertisement | advertise on newsday

In addition, all registered nurses must be proficient in anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, pharmacology and other sciences to practice competently. This requires education, which develops the necessary knowledge base, as well as critical thinking skills.

Omitting the term education promotes the fallacy that nurses are simply technicians and not professional-level providers. This misconception is detrimental to the public's understanding of nursing practice, as well as to the profession itself.

Lois Biggin Moylan, Rockville Centre

Editor's note: The writer is a professor of nursing at Molloy College.