I disagree with Opinion page writer Saul Schachter from his very first sentence [“8 ways we can improve presidential elections,” Nov. 26]. He tries to set the tone by saying that we can all agree that our system is broken. It’s not. It worked exactly as intended by our laws and Constitution.

Only people who have served as vice president, in Congress, or as governor need apply for the presidency? My mother told me when I was young that if I studied and worked hard, even I could grow up and become president. One of our greatest presidents grew up barefoot in a cabin in the woods. Would that be possible in Schachter’s America?

As for throwing out the Electoral College, please remember that at the beginning of our struggle for freedom, the rallying cry was taxation without representation is tyranny. So, Americans in Iowa, Idaho, the Dakotas and Montana — and all sparsely populated — would have to obey federal laws, pay taxes, and yet have no voice in the selection of our president? The East and West coasts, densely populated, would always choose our presidents. Many of those states are liberal Democratic enclaves.

There are other suggestions he makes, such as shortening campaigns and reducing the influence of money, that I do agree with.

Kenneth Tozzi, Lindenhurst

 

Saul Schachter’s eminently sensible and sane pro-democracy suggestions for our elections should be forwarded to every politician and leaders of the Democratic and Republican parties. But it’s improbable that such reforms will ever be enacted. The notorious 2016 campaign should be a watershed event for U.S. politics and media, but will it result in any pro-democracy changes?

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Ed Ciaccio, Douglaston