Letter: Women in combat forcing peace?

Pentagon Chief Leon Panetta has removed the ban

Pentagon Chief Leon Panetta has removed the ban on women serving in combat roles. The ban removal was reportedly recommended by the Joint Chiefs of Staff, overturning a 1994 rule keeping women out of ground combat units. (Credit: Getty Images)

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Columnist Kathleen Parker offers no credible evidence why women could not serve in combat roles ["Women don't belong in combat roles," Opinion, Feb. 3]. She cites upper body strength as reasons why this is a bad idea. Is she referring to the average Long Island mom, who is frequently seen in public carrying not only her groceries, but her children in the crook of her arm, and strollers in tow, while simultaneously signing for purchases? That is the average mother I witness, to say nothing of a woman who has strength-trained for months in boot camp.

And yet, Parker's plea to reason has merit. She claims that the screams of young women in combat would "kill us in the end." If by that she means that Americans would find these horrors too ugly to bear, then, yes, I agree. But if that results in our nation losing its acquired tolerance for violence and war, then let them serve. The sooner we as a nation return to some level of sense and sensitivity, the better it will be for the soul of our country.

Jon Zipkin, Bay Shore

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