I’ve read letters by women stating there’s no reason for women to march because they don’t feel oppressed [“Two days that shook the world,” Letters, Jan. 24].

I marched in New York City proudly, not because I personally feel oppressed, but to let President Donald Trump’s administration know that we’re watching.

This administration has stated outright that it wants to change laws involving women’s rights. It wants to defund Planned Parenthood, using erroneous statistics that 94 percent of its services are abortions. In reality, Planned Parenthood says that its 2013 figure was 3 percent. The majority of what it provides are testing and treatment for sexually transmitted diseases, contraceptives, cancer screenings and prenatal services.

Women should fight. That we blame only women for unwanted pregnancies is unbelievable.

Maureen Martin, Islip

 

It was interesting to participate in the march in Washington [“Hear them roar,” News, Jan. 22]. It was disheartening for Hillary Clinton supporters and Democrats to lose the election. In all this, there is a message.

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Democrats, though outnumbering Republicans, do not participate in the elections as much as the Republicans do. Republicans know the power of the ballot box better.

No wonder there are more Republican-controlled statehouses and governorships.

It’s a myth that America has a vibrant democracy. One cannot say that if just over half of eligible voters participate. Nor does the United States have a democratic franchise, because the losing candidate received almost 3 million more votes than the winning candidate.

A state with fewer than 1 million people has the same number of senators as a state with more than 20 million people. Call it whatever you want, but this is no way to practice universal franchise and call this a country where individual votes really count.

Yogendra Upadhyay, Roslyn Heights