Letters: Bus monitor heckling can escalate

A journalist checks out the fundraising website indiegogo.com A journalist checks out the fundraising website indiegogo.com in Washington, DC. indiegogo.com started accepting donations, aiming to raise $5,000 USD to send bus monitor Karen Klein on a vacation. (June 21, 2012) Photo Credit: Getty Images

advertisement | advertise on newsday

The middle-school boys who so viciously verbally attacked a 68-year-old bus monitor, Karen Klein, should be made to apologize face to face in the presence of their parents and school officials ["Generosity needs to go beyond the bus," Opinion, June 25].

This is a teachable moment, and these boys should be made to hear directly from her how awful they made her feel. They should also understand that she is a human being, a mother and a daughter. How would they feel if this had happened to their mothers or sisters or grandmothers?

This attack needs to be personalized and they need to know the extent of the damage they have caused. It would be a mistake for the discipline to be doled out solely by the boys' parents.

Although this does not appear to qualify as a criminal act, these boys should be made to perform community service by addressing other youngsters about the evils of bullying. Bringing this incident into the light of day, some good can result by learning from it in the future.

John T. McLoughlin, Bay Shore

Like the monitor on the bus who was verbally taunted and bullied by middle-schoolers in Greece, N.Y., a woman in Rockville Centre was allegedly threatened by drunken high schoolers as she walked her dog ["Cops: Teens beat man after wife accosted," News, June 23].

The woman went home and told her husband, and he went looking for them to demand an apology. Police say they knocked him down and beat him.

advertisement | advertise on newsday

When those Greece middle-schoolers get to be in high school, they could turn violent like the Rockville Centre group.

Paul Lieberman, Bohemia

You also may be interested in: