Letters: Don't blame gamers for violence

Video games seized by the law enforcement officials

Video games seized by the law enforcement officials are shown at the Wayne County Sheriff's office in Detroit. (Credit: AP, 2005)

Travel deals

I get a real kick out of reading about people who want to ban, regulate, censor, etc., every single thing they feel is causing their children to turn violent ["Link to video gore?" Letters, Dec. 19].

I guess they don't realize that the next step is book-burning. Whatever happened to a parent's responsibility to supply the censorship in the family, instead of relying on some outside agency to legislate it for all? They obviously don't have the backbone to confront their kids and say no once in a while.

Dom Gervasi, Wantagh

Too much emphasis and blame are being put on video games and their effect on kids. My two sons are video gamers and enjoy the Modern Warfare games, as well as Madden 13, MLB, NBA and other sports games. They also participate in our baseball league, basketball, school activities and do their schoolwork.

We parents need to be 100 percent involved in our children's lives. We need to know who their friends are, what they're doing and where they're going. But most of all, we need to communicate with them always.

Teaching our children right from wrong, realty from fantasy, fact from fiction, makes me secure in knowing that they can differentiate between what they see on a video screen and real life.

Andrew Martorano, Lindenhurst

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