I never thought I’d see the day when a winner was a sore loser [“Stop being a sore winner,” Editorial, Nov. 29].

With Donald Trump’s baseless assertion that his loss in the popular vote was due to voter fraud, I have to conclude that we have elected a president who has no regard for the truth.

Paul Jacobs, Huntington

 

President-elect Donald Trump appears to be backtracking on some of his campaign rhetoric [“Trump on the issues,” News, Nov. 23]. He has no plans to prosecute Hillary Clinton, and he’s doubtful about torturing terror suspects. Now would be a good time to reconsider the Mexico wall, too.

Rudolph Vilardi, Islip

 

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I’m sure that soon there will be a morning when I don’t wake up with a knot in the pit of my stomach about the results of the presidential election [“The Trump transition,” News, Nov. 21]. I certainly hope so.

But the sad reality is that what happened on Nov. 8 was unlike anything that has ever happened in America’s once-proud history of constitutional democracy. This was not merely one side losing to another over good-faith differences over policies. That sort of political defeat is inevitable as the pendulum of Democratic and Republican government swings back and forth.

Donald Trump, however, did not run on policy. He ran on a cult of personality and a toxic cocktail of fear, bigotry, disrespect and hatred unlike anything seen since Europe in the 1930s. We are left to guess at what he and cronies like Stephen Bannon might do with the incredible power they’ve been handed.

And as painful as it is for me to say, almost half the American electorate — roughly 62 million people — betrayed their country’s history and values to empower a man who has perverted everything that made America great.

Geoffrey R. Kaiser, Uniondale