The hacking of emails by the Russians is not a partisan issue [“Giuliani gets adviser role,” News, Jan. 13]. The Democrats, many Republicans — such as Sens. Lindsey Graham and John McCain — and the CIA see the hacking as a serious issue because it undermines the foundation of our democracy.

We can never know for sure whether or how Russian meddling affected the outcome of this election. We do know that President Donald Trump legitimized the hacking by prompting his campaign team to advertise the contents on every news venue available. It’s safe to assume the emails were seen by the Trump team as having political benefit.

He showered admiration on Russian President Vladimir Putin while skewering the reputation of our intelligence agencies. I believe this weakens our security.

Judging by the amount of time the Trump campaign focused on the emails in the last weeks of the election, it’s safe to assume they were seen as having political benefit.

What we don’t know is whether Trump cozying up to the Kremlin was motivated by financial connections. We haven’t seen his tax returns.

Judy Pullman, Long Beach

 

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When it came to the two most important issues on foreign matters in my lifetime, our intelligence community either lied or misinformed the public. The first was the Gulf of Tonkin incident that President Lyndon Johnson used to escalate our military involvement in Vietnam. The second was the claim of weapons of mass destruction in Iraq.

Now, we are expected to believe the intelligence community about Russian involvement in our presidential election. I’ve heard it all before. We should all be very skeptical of the information provided. There are many hidden agendas.

Dick Coleman, Mount Sinai