No matter one's opinion of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's eloquent speech to Congress or President Barack Obama's response, what is clear is that the stakes of the nuclear talks with Iran are extremely high ["Netanyahu plays to crowd," Editorial, March 4].

It's for this reason that the U.S. Congress needs to vote on any proposed deal with a radicalized Islamic republic that has nuclear ambitions. It's the Congress that must decide as America's representatives whether such an agreement would be a bad deal or would actually stop Iran from acquiring such destructive weapons.The secretive approach pursued by the Obama administration is not in the best interests of the American public.

Ron Weiss, St. James

EditorialEditorial: What Netanyahu speech means for U.S.CartoonsCartoonists on the Iran negotiations

Benjamin Netanyahu clearly believes that he has a greater understanding of Iran and its government than the United States has.

Let us not lose sight of the fact that he promotes the cause of a foreign power and isn't charged with protecting the best interests of the United States. Viewed in the best possible light, he is interfering with U.S. foreign policy and undermining our president and secretary of state.

Brian O'Keefe, East Patchogue

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Benjamin Netanyahu has been an obstacle to peace in the Mideast. He holds power as prime minister in Israel in part thanks to the Palestinian leaders. Their intransigence and reluctance to compromise have impeded the peace process.

In turn, Israelis have turned to hard-liner Netanyahu out of desperation and frustration. Netanyahu doesn't want to compromise, nor does he want peace.

Michael Shapiro, Merrick

What if Winston Churchill had wanted to come to the United States in 1940 and tell Congress about the nightmare facing the free world?

Would President Franklin D. Roosevelt have replied, "Gee, Winnie, I would love to hear what you have to say, but this meeting will fall just a couple of weeks before re-election in England, and I just can't do it. It would be better if you stayed home and let the coming disaster play itself out. We have a nice arrangement with Germany."

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We were so fortunate as a country that, once upon a time, we had the leadership and logic we needed to survive and prosper. Boy have we taken a wrong turn!

Steve Feuer, Oceanside

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