Letters: Long Beach and its Sandy recovery

Portions of the Long Beach boardwalk were twisted

Portions of the Long Beach boardwalk were twisted and destroyed by superstorm Sandy. (Nov. 18, 2012) Photo Credit: Newsday/Thomas A. Ferrara

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Yes, Long Beach is on the mend, but don't let this slow progress fool you -- they are still in pretty bad shape and need as much help as they can get ["After Sandy: Long Beach on the mend," News, Dec. 4].

I was a volunteer at one of the Red Cross/Federal Emergency Management Agency help stations that is closing down, because the business spaces they occupy are returning -- which is a good thing. The bad thing is that these emergency stations are still needed, and Long Beach needs to organize home delivery of meals for the many who still do not have transportation. What good is FEMA money or supplies if people cannot get to them?

The emergency stations actually ran out of water and toiletries. Where is all the donated money going?

I gave a ride to a woman and her infant. She was walking across broken streets and moldy debris, pushing a cart in the bitter cold. I dropped her off at a house that looked broken down and uninhabitable.

Yes, the fortunate few who had all their insurance policies in place are moving on, but for many others, it is still a long, hard process, especially in these colder months.

Long Beach needs to think about its people before worrying about the boardwalk.

Lisa Salzano, East Meadow

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Why the rush to spend so much taxpayer money rebuilding the city of Long Beach, when in 2006, as Newsday correctly points out, the very same city turned down a federal- and state-supported giant dune building project, because it would have obstructed the views? ["Long Beach seeks Army Corps help," News, Dec. 3.]

We in the Hamptons would have jumped at an almost-free sand replenishment project along our beaches, and I bet Fire Island and Mastic would have too.

Larry Penny, Sag Harbor

Editor's note: The writer is a retired natural resources director for the Town of East Hampton.


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