A dependable and affordable mass transit network is the imminent need of every megacity in the United States ["Hudson tunnel deal gives rail the priority it needs," Editorial, Sept. 18].

Besides decongesting our traffic-choked roads and highways, mass transit would certainly offer our present and future generations a cleaner environment and help alleviate the menace of global warming.

I'm a regular subway commuter and a frequent rail commuter in the Northeast corridor. A deal between New York and New Jersey for a Hudson River train tunnel could be better and more financially viable if it could a be a broader deal. Washington, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, Rhode Island and Massachusetts are served by the Northeast corridor rail line and could also be included as partners.

Unless improving mass transit within our cities and among states is treated as a top priority, I'm afraid the congressional politics of lobbying and shortsighted interests will further jam the creaky wheels of our outdated and failing public transportation system and its weak infrastructure.

Atul M. Karnik, Woodside

Harborfields needs all-day kindergarten

I was happy to see the picture of kindergarten students enjoying their first full day at Bowling Green Elementary School in Westbury ["A very full day indeed," News, Sept. 18].

Unfortunately, the Harborfields school district has not yet made full-day kindergarten a priority, despite all the research and evidence that supports the importance of such programs.

The district holds the (dis)honor of being one of the last two districts on Long Island without full-day kindergarten.

Harborfields has been a respected and high-performing school district, so why does it set up its newest students to play catch-up from the very first day of school?

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With new, higher standards, the children of Harborfields are being expected to achieve the same amount of growth and learning as children who have more than double the amount of time each day.

Jennifer Marino Rojas, Centerport

Editor's note: The writer has a kindergartener and a second-grader in the district.

Nurses deserve more respect

There is no excuse for the comments made about a Miss America contestant who is a nurse by Joy Behar and Michelle Collins of "The View" ["'View' hosts apologize for nurse comments," News, Sept. 17]. Their apology to Kelley Johnson was even more offensive to nurses than the thoughtless remarks made during the show.

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Nurses devote their lives to caring for the most vulnerable people, making sure that they are treated with dignity and respect. Clearly, the members of "The View" felt it was more important to ridicule the contestant than to actually listen to her amazing story of caring for a patient with Alzheimer's disease.

Jennifer Bryer, Hewlett

Editor's note: The writer is a registered nurse.

Yogi Berra was a special person

Yogi Berra was a great baseball player and a very special person. He provided many unforgettable moments on the diamond ["American dream 'personified,' " Sports, Sept. 30].

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One of my most vivid memories is of Jackie Robinson stealing home in the 1955 World Series, with Berra jumping up and down to protest the call. Years later, Berra still said Robinson was out.

Of course, his Yogi-isms are timeless. He was wise enough to realize that cash is just as good as money.

Bob Buscavage, Moriches

Long-term insurers must keep promises

I was disappointed that the article on long-term care insurance didn't address that many insurers fail to pay on these policies ["Paying for elder care," Business, Sept. 20].

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My mother-in-law has been diagnosed with dementia and is in assisted living. Her policy states that only severe dementia is covered. After many medical and cognitive tests, her neurologist diagnosed her dementia as severe; however, the insurance representative disagreed with the doctor.

I've spoken to the staff at the assisted living facility as well as family members of other residents. Many say they had long-term care policies and are not collecting on them. The better way to protect yourself is to buy an annuity, as the article mentioned.

William Bruno, Bohemia