It’s an outrage that convicted felon Dean Skelos will qualify for a $95,000 pension [“Convicted, Skelos seeks pension,” News, Dec. 30].

Had he been convicted of crimes unrelated to his position, this would be bad enough, but considering that his crimes were directly facilitated by his job the pension is absurd. Only in the public sector would such obvious malfeasance be tolerated. In private industry if you committed a crime in your official capacity, you’d never collect a pension.

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It’s high time our politicians had the guts to amend the law so that those who work for the people would forfeit their pensions should they be convicted of a crime directly related to their position. Perhaps then they would reconsider criminal activity if they knew they also would face economic loss.

Stephen Martin, Wading River

 

If Adam Skelos goes to prison and gets a job there, will it be a no-show job? Or will he actually have to show up?

Raymond P. Moran, Massapequa Park