Sheriff's Deputy Ben Fields went too far in how he removed the South Carolina student from her classroom ["Deputy fired after video," News, Oct. 29].

However -- and I know this is not politically correct -- the student first disobeyed her teacher, then a school administrator and finally the deputy. It never should have been necessary to call in the sheriff! Is the student not expected to respect and follow the instructions of her teacher and school administrator? What message does this send her fellow students?

John Molesphini, Valley Stream

I do not usually watch "The View," but I'd like to address the remark made by co-host Raven-Symone about a student who was assaulted by a sheriff's deputy after refusing to stop using her cellphone in class [" 'We love Raven,' " News, Nov. 2]. Raven-Symone said the girl should follow school rules.

The student was asked to stop using her phone and chose not to obey the teacher or the rule. This was policy, not a race issue. It became a race issue because a black student refused to obey a white teacher. A sheriff's deputy was called, and the student was dragged from her seat. That became a race issue because the student was black and the deputy was white.

We tend to make judgments about race in instances like this. The real issue is doing what you're told in a setting where a teacher is responsible for the welfare and education of the group.

Gail Starkie, Southold

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When I was growing up, a teacher's status was almost like that of royalty; he or she could do no wrong.

God forbid the school called my house because of bad classroom behavior. I was toast, even if I was in the right.

Today's students don't respect teachers. That young girl was forcibly ejected from her chair by the deputy. Did he use excessive force? It certainly looked like it, but once again, here is an example of disrespect to authority.

People have to learn to behave.

Bob Cavaliere, Port Jefferson Station