Letters: Wrong on housing, foreign policies

"If this imaginary apology tour were really going

"If this imaginary apology tour were really going on," writes Bob Keeler, "what would the fantasty apologizer be apologizing for?" (Credit: iStock.com Photo)

Bob Keeler's column "Sorry if all this apologizing is bothering you" [Opinion, Oct. 1] was a breath of fresh air.

All too often, notions of American exceptionalism blind the public to the actions and results of American imperialism. We should indeed ponder U.S. policies and their effects on so many nations, including Iran, Chile, Guatemala and Iraq.

Mark Twain and other peace-seeking Americans strongly opposed imperialism in 1898, as this country embarked on a war against Spain to achieve empire in its own right, committing horrendous atrocities in the Philippines. We became an empire in 1898, abandoning cherished ideals of our democratic republic.

The current political campaign for president does not address this central foreign policy issue. Both major parties still pursue an interventionist, imperialist foreign policy. Third parties must be given a chance to propose alternatives to this insanity.

The Green Party's candidate, Jill Stein, is proposing deep cuts in the military budget, closing U.S. military bases overseas, ending our needless wars, and creating a Green New Deal for our country.

Jim Brown, Long Beach

Editor's note: The writer is the chairman of the Green Party of Nassau County.
 

While I agree with many of Bob Keeler's points, I argue with the claim that government haters "detest the part of the government that tries to regulate greed and help the poor."

Actually, we conservatives are for doing what is logical in the expectation logic will take us where we want to go. If we look at the mortgage debacle, we see that regulating greed was not the problem; the regulations were in place, but the enforcement was not, and that was on purpose.

Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, in a desire to help the poor, ignored regulations and common sense, leading directly to the fiscal mess we are in today. They granted mortgages to people who could never pay them back.

William Plackenmeyer, Deer Park

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