Lost in the coverage of the Nassau Coliseum's redevelopment ["Not yet shovel ready," News, April 30] is the simple but compelling fact that private investment, not taxpayer dollars, will transform the facility from an obsolete and worn-out building to a state-of-the-art destination that generates jobs, investment and tax revenue.

Newsday's reporting suggests there are multiple hurdles to be addressed before groundbreaking. That is true of any major construction project, and certainly true of one such as this, which will serve the region for generations to come. It would be wise, however, to explore the strategic economic rate of return for residents rather than speculate on when and how the Town of Hempstead will conduct a planning review for the site. The same holds true for whether the NHL will embrace future opportunities in Uniondale -- the league has a fiduciary obligation to say "show me the building" before offering an affirmative opinion.

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This administration has reinvented the economic foundation upon which the Coliseum will be operated far into the future. Taxpayers will receive 8 percent of the gross revenue from whatever and whoever plays in this building. While Nassau County welcomes the NHL in any capacity, this project is focused on ensuring the Coliseum is run like a business for the purpose of enhancing our economy, protecting property values and strengthening our quality of life.

In the interest of full disclosure, readers should be advised that Newsday and Madison Square Garden, a losing bidder, are owned by the same parent company. The MSG bid was not chosen because it would have generated much less revenue for the taxpayers of Nassau County.

Edward P. Mangano, Mineola

Editor's note: The writer is the Nassau County executive.