Newsday editorial off base on police work

“Somebody killed a policeman today and a part of America died.” This line, part of a sad poem by Harry Koch, has been around for years. Well, a big part of America died Thursday [“5 officers killed in Dallas,” News, July 8].

Also shocking is Newsday’s editorial, “Another day, another killing” [July 7].

The editorial states that a video “seems to show police shooting at point-blank range,” and “it doesn’t look like the officer needed to shoot.” The investigation is just beginning, but already judgment has been passed.

The editorial says the consensus is that the police culture has to change, and officers do use unneeded force. Where did these assertions come from?

In every profession, there are incidents of misconduct. They are dealt with swiftly, and they should be. Good cops don’t want to be around bad cops. However, Nassau County Police Benevolent Association president Jim Carver is on point when he says that changes in use of force could compromise officer safety [“Carver: Delay new policy on use of force,” News, July 6].

Newsday needs to be balanced regarding the issues. The editorial suggests that “thousands” have been shot and killed by police officers. How many police officers have been killed in the line of duty so far this year in the United States?

The events in Dallas show just how dangerous being a cop is. Our nation, state and county are lucky to have such dedicated men and women.

Denis J. Monette

Massapequa

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Editor’s note: The writer is a retired assistant commissioner for the Nassau County Police Department, a senior research fellow with the Institute for Counter-Terrorism in Israel, and an adjunct professor at LIU Post.