Letters: Obama should build carbon consensus

Reported on Jun. 5, 2014, this year's 'G7'

Reported on Jun. 5, 2014, this year's 'G7' summit excluded Russian President Vladmir Putin to send a strong message - halt the support of violence in Ukraine. (Credit: AP) (Credit: AP / Yves Logghe)

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President Barack Obama's plan calls for a 30 percent decrease in domestic carbon emissions by 2030 ["Aim to cut pollution," News, June 2]. Will the rest of the world -- developed and developing nations -- be so awed by America's sacrifice that they will follow suit?

Nations look out for their self-interests and are more likely to sit on the sidelines than lend a hand. The only way to win this battle is to have all nations participate and sacrifice. This requires a consensus president. Sadly, Obama does not fit this bill, and any "leadership" generated by a go-it-alone strategy is pure folly.

Consensus is possible. Witness John Adams and Thomas Jefferson. In 1776, they managed to pull together a Declaration of Independence by obtaining the required support of all 13 colonies. If even one colony refused, independence would have died on the vine.

Real leadership cries out for consensus builders today, just as it did during that hot July summer almost twelve score years ago.

Kenneth E. Heard, Smithtown
 

The highest point on Long Island, Jayne's Hill, is about 400 feet above sea level. In the most extreme case, if all the ice on the planet melted, the sea would rise 220 feet.

Coastal regions on Long Island are not prepared for gradual sea-level rise. Long Beach received $13 million in state aid to shore up the coast from flooding with extra sand, and we cannot continue to rely on state aid.

People cannot continue to dismiss this problem.

Keith Lisy, East Northport
 

Coastline residents worry about the next storm as global warming continues. These residents also worry about the possibility that their homes could disappear from rising water in 50 years. Entire cities could no longer exist if global warming continues and the oceans rise.

At the same time, parts of the United States are suffering from severe drought.

Why not build giant lakes and pipe water in from the ocean? We could build desalination plants like Israel and supply water to millions of people.

Yes, it would be a massive undertaking, but it could solve many problems.

Barry Vineberg, Oceanside
 

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