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Analysis, discussion and opinions by members of Newsday's editorial board.

Keeping politics away from Ground Zero is the right call

A wreath is laid at the World Trade

A wreath is laid at the World Trade Center's South Tower during a ceremony at the Sept. 11 memorial to honor recovery workers and first responders. (May 30, 2012) (Credit: Craig Ruttle)

Sometimes less really is more--for instance, next year, when the ceremony at Ground Zero marking the eleventh anniversary of the 9-11 attacks will be limited to family members reading the names of the victims.
 
There’s an elegant simplicity in that approach announced Wednesday in a letter from the National September 11 Memorial & Museum to relatives of the victims. It just feels right, and not only because it means no speeches by politicians.
 
Elected officials, such as Presidents Barack Obama and George W. Bush, actually demonstrated admirable restraint in last year’s 10th anniversary ceremony, tastefully drawing their remarks from the Bible, Abraham Lincoln and Shakespeare. But by stripping the 2012 program to its essence, there’s no danger the event will be politicized in this election year.
 
As in the past, participants will pause six times, representing the moments each tower was hit and then fell, and when the Pentagon and Flight 93 were attacked.
 
Befitting the occasion, the ceremony will be simple, solemn and profound. 
 
Pictured above: A wreath is laid at the World Trade Center's South Tower during a ceremony at the Sept. 11 memorial to honor recovery workers and first responders. (May 30, 2012)

Tags: Ground Zero , 9-11 , Barack Obama , George Bush , Bible , Abraham Lincoln , Flight 93 , Pentagon

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