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Filler: Mitt Romney and Barack Obama are fired up as they spar on energy policy

Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney and President Barack

Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney and President Barack Obama spar over energy policy during the second presidential debate at Hofstra University. (Oct. 16, 2012) (Credit: AP)

The second question is on energy, and prices and the Energy Department, and the candidates' plans.
Obama touts new energy, and increased natural gas and oil exploration, and increased fuel standards.

Obama is on the attack in every answer, always touting what he will do, then trashing Romney.

Romney argues that none of the additional oil production over the past four years came on federal lands. I'm not really sure what this point means, though I've heard him make it numerous times. Exploration has expanded, and where it has expanded isn't really a big issue.


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Romney's big issue is energy independence within 8 years. More drilling, more permits and licenses, the Keystone Pipeline, etc.

Obama says we are actually drilling more on public lands now than before. I don't think any normal people know who is telling the truth here. On coal, Obama is saying Romney opposed coal burning as governor of Massachusetts.

Back and forth now, Romney and Obama throwing down on what has happened on oil and gas production.

Obama says he pulled unused leases to drill on public lands, rather than reducing drilling.

Romeny is now chasing Obama across the stage, and they're arguing like me and my wife do over who left the garage open.

"That's just not true."

"No, what you said isn't true."

"You'll get your chance, I'm still speaking."

These guys are both fired up and the aggression is palpable. Neither wants to be seen as backing down.

Obama says Romney may be able to bring down gas prices by pursuing policies so drastic he destroys all demand, a la Bush. It's a very nicely turned line.

Romney insists on one more shot to answer, and Crowley shuts him down. But no, Romney perseveres, and Crowley is on the ropes. You can't stop Romney, you can only hope to contain him.

This thing is wild.

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