+-
A forlorn-looking sculpture sits at the base of (Credit: AP)

A forlorn-looking sculpture sits at the base of President James A. Garfield's statue on Capitol Hill in anticipation of a possible federal government shutdown in 1995. With the clock ticking toward a midnight shutdown, President Clinton vetoed a temporary borrowing bill and prepared to close most government operations in a political fight with Congress. (Nov. 13, 1995)

Past government shutdowns

The federal government put non-essential government workers on furlough and suspended non-essential services from November 14 through November 19, 1995 and from December 16, 1995 to January 6, 1996.

A forlorn-looking sculpture sits at the base of
(Credit: AP)

A forlorn-looking sculpture sits at the base of President James A. Garfield's statue on Capitol Hill in anticipation of a possible federal government shutdown in 1995. With the clock ticking toward a midnight shutdown, President Clinton vetoed a temporary borrowing bill and prepared to close most government operations in a political fight with Congress. (Nov. 13, 1995)

U.S. Park Service Police Officer P.G. Carroll stands
(Credit: AP )

U.S. Park Service Police Officer P.G. Carroll stands in front of closed signs at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington as the partial shutdown of the federal government continued. Hundreds of thousands of government workers got another day off Wednesday as President Clinton and the Republican Congress remained at odds over budget priorities. (Nov. 15, 1995)

A sign hangs in the window of an
(Credit: AP)

A sign hangs in the window of an information booth at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington announcing the temporary closure of the attraction due to the government shutdown. Parts of the federal government were ordered shut down Saturday as President Clinton blamed the Republican Congress for attempting to force unacceptable cuts in programs affecting the lives of children, the elderly and the poor. (Dec. 16, 1995)

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISE HERE
The sun gleams down on the still-closed Washington
(Credit: AP)

The sun gleams down on the still-closed Washington Monument in Washington as the federal budget impasse continued. Brawling and bargaining by turns, President Clinton and Republican Congressional leaders are struggling to make progress toward a balanced budget while blaming each other for a partial government shutdown that has inconvenienced millions. (Jan. 4, 1996)

Senate Minority Leader Tom Daschle of South Dakota,
(Credit: AP )

Senate Minority Leader Tom Daschle of South Dakota, left, and House Minority Leader Richard Gephardt of Missouri leave the White House after meeting with President Clinton to discuss the budget impasse. The partial federal government shutdown dragged into its 20th day as Republicans cancelled a budget bargaining session with the president. (Jan. 4, 1996)

President Clinton ponders a reporter's question during a
(Credit: AP )

President Clinton ponders a reporter's question during a news conference in the White House briefing room to discuss the federal budget impasse. With Republicans holding firm, the House rejected a move to end the 19-day partial government shutdown. The president condemned the defiance and continued impasse, calling it "an unnatural disaster." (Jan. 3, 1996)

House Speaker Newt Gingrich (L) makes a point
(Credit: Reuters)

House Speaker Newt Gingrich (L) makes a point as Senate Majority Leader Robert Dole looks on during a Capitol Hill press conference on the budget impasse. Gingrich reiterated it would not be possible to end the partial U.S. government shutdown before reaching agreement with President Clinton on a seven-year balanced budget plan. (Dec. 28, 1995)

Federal workers hold a demonstration outside the State
(Credit: AP )

Federal workers hold a demonstration outside the State Department in Washington to protest the partial federal government shutdown. House Republican leaders dismissed a Senate plan that would send idled federal workers back to work. President Clinton and Republican leaders have scheduled another White House bargaining session Wednesday in their search for a budget-balancing pact. (Jan. 3, 1996)

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISE HERE
Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich (L) makes
(Credit: Reuters)

Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich (L) makes a point to President Clinton at the start of budget talks in the White House. Gincrich said he, Senate Majority Leader Robert Dole and House Majority leader Dick Armey were trying to work out a legislative mechanism to declare as essential 280,000 federal employees, idled by the partial government shutdown caused by stalled budget negotiations, so they can return to work. (Dec. 29, 1995)

Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole of Kansas ponders
(Credit: AP)

Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole of Kansas ponders a reporter's question as he walks on Capitol Hill. The White House and Congressional Republicans labored Thursday to restart balanced budget talks and grappled with the impact of a six-day partial government shutdown. (Dec. 21, 1995)

White House Chief of Staff Leon Panetta arrives
(Credit: AP )

White House Chief of Staff Leon Panetta arrives on Capitol Hill for a breakfast meeting with Republican Congressional leaders to discuss the continuing federal budget impasse. The White House and Congressional Republicans labored to jump-start balanced budget talks Thursday and grappled with the impact of a six-day partial government shutdown. (Dec. 21, 1995)

Two of the few visitors to Mount Rushmore
(Credit: AP)

Two of the few visitors to Mount Rushmore National Memorial walk into a tunnel that protects visitors from construction of new visitor and concession buildings at the site near Rapid City, S.D. Though trails and most facilities at the memorial were closed due to the government shutdown, the privately contracted construction and the privately owned concession building continued operating, though the concessionaire said if the shutdown continued for 48 hours, employees would be sent home. (Dec. 18, 1995)

Tourists look through coin operated binoculars at the
(Credit: Reuters)

Tourists look through coin operated binoculars at the Statue of Liberty, from New York's Battery Park. The Statue and all other National Parks remain closed during a partial government shutdown as the U.S. Congress and the White House remained deadlocked Sunday in their efforts to reach a balanced budget agreement. (Dec. 17, 1995)

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISE HERE
A sign shows that the passport offices
(Credit: Reuters)

A sign shows that the passport offices in Rockefeller Center in New York are closed. The biggest government shutdown in U.S. history closed many non-essential services. (Nov. 17, 1995)

Republican Congressional freshmen members meet reporters on Capitol
(Credit: AP )

Republican Congressional freshmen members meet reporters on Capitol Hill. At podium, from left are, Rep. Roger Wicker, Sen. Jim Inhofe, Rep. David McIntosh and Rep. Sue Myrick. House Speaker Newt Gingrich suggests their demands contributed to the government shutdown, House Budget Committee Chairman Rep. John Kasich calls them out of control. (Nov. 17, 1995)

Comments

Newsday.com now uses Facebook for our comment boards. Please read our guidelines and connect your Facebook account to comment.