College of New Rochelle establishes scholarship for city residents

New Rochelle Mayor Noam Bramson joins Judith Huntington, New Rochelle Mayor Noam Bramson joins Judith Huntington, president of The College of New Rochelle, and Marianne L. Sussman, chairman of New Rochelle's 325th Anniversary celebration, at the announcement of the college's new scholarship for New Rochelle residents. (Jan. 24, 2013) Photo Credit: Handout

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In honor of the City of New Rochelle's 325th anniversary this year, The College of New Rochelle announced Thursday the creation of an annual scholarship open to only New Rochelle residents.

The New Rochelle Resident Award, a scholarship of up to $9,000, is open to any resident who is accepted and enrolls in either the college's School of Arts & Sciences or School of Nursing.

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"For more than a century, The College of New Rochelle has been an important part of the City of New Rochelle," said Judith Huntington, college president. "We view this special award as an investment in the future of the City of New Rochelle and in its residents as we continue to offer the high quality, affordable education for which we are known."

"This generous scholarship does more than honor our community's past," said New Rochelle Mayor Noam Bramson. "It also helps uphold and expand the educational opportunities that will ensure for New Rochelle a bright future."

"The College of New Rochelle is one of the earliest sponsors of the 325th Anniversary, and their generosity continues as a legacy with this substantial scholarship," said Marianne L. Sussman, 325th Anniversary chairwoman.

To be eligible for the scholarship, students must be nominated by their principal or guidance counselor. The scholarship is renewable each year as long as the student remains enrolled in the college. For further information, email scholarships@cnr.edu.

The community show of support follows by a day the downgrading of the college's bond rating by Moody's in the wake of declining enrollments. At the same time, Moody's expressed confidence that the college's new leadership under Huntington would revive the school's fortunes.

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