The book is called "The 300 Club," by Dan Schlossberg, and the subtitle is, "Have We Seen the Last of Baseball's 300-Game Winners?"

The answer to that question is "Probably, yeah," but that takes up only so much space in a book. So the bulk of the book is focused more on the current club members.

Schlossberg spoke with nine of the 10 living 300-game winners - only Steve Carlton eluded the author - and the write-ups are entertaining enough. There's not a word of Roger Clemens' alleged involvement with illegal performance-enhancing drugs, and I thought that was a little weird, so I e-mailed Schlossberg to ask him if Clemens agreed to the interview in return for not mentioning The Mitchell Report.

"When I negotiated with Roger's agent, I told him I was only interested in his pitching career, not unproven allegations," Schlossberg wrote. "...Many interviewers have asked me what I thought, and I tell them nothing has been proven. I also point out that Roger once had a contract that stipulated the Red Sox had to have a smoke-free bus on the road - he was THAT conscious of what was going into his body. That tells me something."

Well, I don't agree with Schlossberg's take, but more important to my query, I do believe him that Clemens made no demands regarding the content of his chapter.

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Anywho, I'll mail my copy of the book to the first person who e-mails me - at kdavidoff@Newsday.com - with the correct answer to this question:

Of those pitchers who played exclusively since 1901, name the pitcher who came closest to recording 300 wins without getting there.

UPDATE, 2:25 p.m.: We have a winner! NaOH knew that Tommy John won 288 games before running out of chances.