On the 20-year anniversary of the day his father voluntarily accepted a lifetime ban from baseball, Pete Rose Jr. had a message for commissioner Bud Selig.

"Reinstate my dad," Rose Jr. said. "Anybody that has ever laced them up and played the game knows that he should be in the Hall of Fame."

The elder Rose, baseball's all-time hits leader, was exiled from the game for life after betting on games while managing the Cincinnati Reds. Rumors circulated last month that Selig was considering reinstating Rose.

Rose Jr., 39, while acknowledging his lack of objectivity on the matter, says the reinstatement should have taken place 20 years ago but that it would be better late than never.

Rose Jr., who spent two years with the Ducks, went 1-for-3 against his former team last night at Citibank Park and is hitting .281 with three home runs and 24 RBIs for the York Revolution.

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When asked how he feels about steroid users being allowed to continue their careers while his father remains banned from the game, Rose Jr., who spent one month in prison in 2006 for distributing performance-enhancing drugs to teammates, said the offenses are similar.

"Guys get second chances, and that's fine with me," Rose Jr. said. "I just wish that they would give the old man a second chance. I think it would be great for baseball and great for the Rose family. Guys did what they did, and they got their second chance and moved on. So now let's give my dad a second chance and let him move on."

Ducks manager and Hall of Famer Gary Carter doesn't share that sentiment.

"I've got to believe that they have to hold true to their word unless they change that rule," Carter said in reference to baseball's rules against betting.

". . . The majority of the veteran Hall of Famers say Pete will never get in. And I've got to go with what the majority of the rest of the Hall of Famers are thinking because they have basically said there is the pride factor, the integrity, and they have all said if Pete Rose gets in, then take my plaque down in Cooperstown."