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YOGI BERRA DALE BERRA Hall of Famer Yogi (Credit: AP)

YOGI BERRA
DALE BERRA

Hall of Famer Yogi Berra is one of the most revered athletes in New York history. A catcher, Berra played for the Yankees for 18 seasons, hitting 358 home runs in 2,116 games. He played his final four games with the Mets in 1965 at 40 years old. It was deja vu all over again when, in 1977, Yogi’s son Dale made his debut. Dale played in the majors for 11 years, coming off the bench as a utility infielder for much of his career. Dale’s brother, Tim, played for the Baltimore Colts.

Famous MLB father-son duos

There have been dozens of players that have followed their father's footsteps into the MLB. Here are some of the most famous two- and three-generation baseball families.

SANDY ALOMAR SR. ROBERTO ALOMAR, SANDY ALOMAR JR.
(Credit: AP)

SANDY ALOMAR SR.
ROBERTO ALOMAR, SANDY ALOMAR JR.

Sandy Alomar Sr. played for six teams in his 15-year MLB career, including the Mets and Yankees. Roberto, a second baseman, was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011, totaling 2,724 hits, 12 All-Star appearances and 10 Gold Gloves. Sandy Jr. spent his prime as a backup catcher in Cleveland, and wrapped up his career with the Mets in 2007 as a 41-year-old.

FELIPE ALOU MOISES ALOU Felipe Alou, a three-time
(Credit: AP)

FELIPE ALOU
MOISES ALOU

Felipe Alou, a three-time All-Star, finished his career with 2,101 hits in 17 seasons. Moises spent nearly two decades in the majors, including a two-year stint with the Giants from 2005-06 when his father was the manager. The Alou baseball tree extends beyond Felipe and Moises; Jesus and Matty Alou are Felipe’s brothers, Jose Sosa is Felipe’s cousin, and Mel Rojas is Moises’ cousin.

FLOYD BANNISTER BRIAN BANNISTER Floyd Bannister pitched in
(Credit: AP)

FLOYD BANNISTER
BRIAN BANNISTER

Floyd Bannister pitched in the majors from 1977-92, making an All-Star appearance in 1982. Brian was drafted by the Mets in the seventh round of the 2003 amateur draft, but won more than 10 games just once during a five-year MLB career.

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JESSE BARFIELD, RF .231, 62 HR, 189 RBIs
(Credit: AP)

JESSE BARFIELD, RF
.231, 62 HR, 189 RBIs
Jesse Barfield played 12 seasons, including four (1989-1992) with the Yankees. Barfield was known as a power-hitter. He was AL home run champion in 1986, the same year he won the Silver Slugger Award. Barfield also won two Gold Gloves (1986, 1987).

GUS BELL BUDDY BELL DAVID BELL, MIKE BELL
(Credit: AP)

GUS BELL
BUDDY BELL
DAVID BELL, MIKE BELL

Gus Bell made his debut in 1950 with Pittsburgh as a 21-year-old, quickly earning a starting role with the Pirates, then the Reds. In 18 seasons, Buddy Bell amassed 2,513 hits, finishing with a .279 career batting average. He was named to five All-Star games and won six straight Gold Gloves (1979-84) at third base. David bounced around the league, playing for six different teams over a 12-year career. Mike appeared for 19 games with the Reds in 2000.

YOGI BERRA DALE BERRA Hall of Famer Yogi
(Credit: AP)

YOGI BERRA
DALE BERRA

Hall of Famer Yogi Berra is one of the most revered athletes in New York history. A catcher, Berra played for the Yankees for 18 seasons, hitting 358 home runs in 2,116 games. He played his final four games with the Mets in 1965 at 40 years old. It was deja vu all over again when, in 1977, Yogi’s son Dale made his debut. Dale played in the majors for 11 years, coming off the bench as a utility infielder for much of his career. Dale’s brother, Tim, played for the Baltimore Colts.

BOBBY BONDS BARRY BONDS Bobby and Barry Bonds
(Credit: AP)

BOBBY BONDS
BARRY BONDS

Bobby and Barry Bonds are arguably the most successful father-son duo in MLB history. Bobby and Barry both totaled five seasons with at least 30 home runs and 30 steals, and are two of only four players in the 300-300 club. After wearing No. 24 with the Pirates, Barry switched to No. 25 upon signing with the Giants, the same number his father wore, and became the all-time leader in home runs with 762. Barry’s godfather is Willie Mays and is a distant cousin of Reggie Jackson.

RAY BOONE BOB BOONE AARON BOONE, BRET BOONE
(Credit: AP)

RAY BOONE
BOB BOONE
AARON BOONE, BRET BOONE

Ray Boone spent 13 years in the majors as an infielder, making two All-Star teams in 1954 and 1956. Bob was drafted by the Phillies in 1969, nine years after his father Ray retired, and went on to win five gold gloves and make four All-Star teams as a catcher for the Phillies, Angels and Royals. When Bret made his debut in 1992, he became the first third-generation player in MLB history. He went on to make three All-Star teams, including a huge 2001 season that saw him finish with 37 homers and 141 RBI. Aaron is best known for his winning home run in Game 7 of the 2003 ALCS for the Yankees against the Red Sox.

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PEDRO BORBON SR. PEDRO BORBON JR. Pedro Borbon
(Credit: AP)

PEDRO BORBON SR.
PEDRO BORBON JR.

Pedro Borbon spent most of his career as a reliever for the Cincinnati Reds, winning a pair of World Series titles in 1975 and 1976. His son, Pedro Jr., made his major-league debut for the Atlanta Braves in 1992, and went on to pitch for five teams over a nine-year career.

SAL BUTERA DREW BUTERA Sal Butera bounced around
(Credit: The Topps Company)

SAL BUTERA
DREW BUTERA

Sal Butera bounced around the majors as a backup catcher for nine years, playing for the Twins, Tigers, Expos, Reds and Blue Jays. When Drew, also a catcher, made his major league debut with the Twins in 2010, the Buteras became the first father-son duo to both play for Minnesota.

JOSE CANO ROBINSON CANO Jose Cano pitched 23
(Credit: AP)

JOSE CANO
ROBINSON CANO

Jose Cano pitched 23 innings for the Astros in 1989, allowing 13 earned runs and 24 hits. Robinson made his debut with the Yankees in 2005, and in 2009, broke out as one of the best second baseman in the league, batting .320 with 25 home runs and 85 RBI. Jose and Robinson participated in the 2011 Home Run Derby together, with Jose pitching to his son. Robinson won the competition, and later announced that he and his father would be back for the 2012 derby.

EDDIE COLLINS SR. EDDIE COLLINS JR. Eddie Collins
(Credit: AP)

EDDIE COLLINS SR.
EDDIE COLLINS JR.

Eddie Collins was one the premier hitters of the early 20th century, finishing his career with 3,315 hits in 25 seasons. Collins also played for the 1919 Black Sox, though he wasn’t accused of throwing the World Series. Eddie Jr. made his debut in 1939, the same year his father was inducted into the Hall of Fame, and finished with 81 hits in three seasons.

JOSE CRUZ SR. JOSE CRUZ JR. Jose Cruz
(Credit: AP)

JOSE CRUZ SR.
JOSE CRUZ JR.

Jose Cruz Sr. was one of three brothers to play in the majors, joined by Hector and Tommy. Cruz played for 19 seasons and finished in the top 10 in MVP balloting three times. His son, Jose Jr., played for nine teams over his 12-year MLB career, seven of those teams for one season or less. Jose Sr. coached his son on the 2006 Puerto Rico team that participated in the World Baseball Classic.

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RON DAVIS IKE DAVIS Ron and Ike Davis
(Credit: Getty Images (left) and AP)

RON DAVIS
IKE DAVIS

Ron and Ike Davis both played in New York; Ron for the Yankees, and son Ike for the Mets. Ron spent four years with the Yankees, including his 1979 rookie season, when he went 14-2 with a 2.85 ERA out of the bullpen. He finished fourth in Rookie of the Year voting. Ike also had an impressive rookie year, hitting .264 with 19 home runs in 2010 and finishing seventh in ROY voting.

DOUG DRABEK KYLE DRABEK Doug Drabek pitched in
(Credit: AP)

DOUG DRABEK
KYLE DRABEK

Doug Drabek pitched in the majors for 13 seasons. A starter, Drabek posted a sub-3.00 ERA four times, including in 1990 when he won the Cy Young Award. Kyle was taken 18th overall in the 2008 draft. He made his debut in 2010 for Toronto, acquired from the Phillies in a package for Roy Halladay.

DAVE DUNCAN CHRIS DUNCAN, SHELLEY DUNCAN Dave Duncan
(Credit: AP)

DAVE DUNCAN
CHRIS DUNCAN, SHELLEY DUNCAN

Dave Duncan made his debut in 1964 as an 18-year-old. He played 11 years and made one All-Star team. Both Chris and Shelley showed flashes of power — Chris hit 22 homers for the Cardinals as a 25-year old, and Shelley hit seven homers in 74 at-bats with the Yankees in 2007 — but neither have landed a consistent starting role. Dave’s nephew, Eric, was drafted by the Yankees and is currently in the Royals’ organization.

CECIL FIELDER PRINCE FIELDER Cecil Fielder was one
(Credit: AP)

CECIL FIELDER
PRINCE FIELDER

Cecil Fielder was one of the best power hitters of the early and mid-1990s, hitting at least 30 home runs six times from 1990-96. Like his father, Prince burst on to the scene, hitting his 200th home run as a 27-year-old. Prince (50 in 2007) and Cecil (51 in 1990) are the only father and son to both hit 50 home runs in a season.

TITO FRANCONA TERRY FRANCONA Tito Francona played for
(Credit: AP)

TITO FRANCONA
TERRY FRANCONA

Tito Francona played for nine different teams in 15 seasons. He hit better than .300 twice in a three-year span, including 1959 when he batted .363 and finished fifth in MVP voting. Terry, also nicknamed Tito, was a reserve for 10 years. After his playing career, he managed Boston to the 2004 World Series championship, its first in 86 years. Tito also won the 2007 World Series with the Red Sox.

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KEN GRIFFEY SR. KEN GRIFFEY JR. Both Ken
(Credit: AP)

KEN GRIFFEY SR.
KEN GRIFFEY JR.

Both Ken Griffey Sr. and his son played outfield for the Mariners in 1990 and 1991. The two hit back-to-back home runs on Sept. 14, 1990, the first father-son duo to accomplish the feat in league history. Ken Sr. made three All-Star teams in his 19-year career; Ken Jr. made 13 and is regarded as one of the best hitters in major league history.

TONY GWYNN SR. TONY GWYNN JR. Tony Gwynn
(Credit: AP)

TONY GWYNN SR.
TONY GWYNN JR.

Tony Gwynn Sr. spent his entire MLB career with the San Diego Padres. Gwynn had 3,141 hits over his career, batted .338, and was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2007. His son plays for the Dodgers, his third team. Both Gwynns hit doubles on July 19 — Tony Sr. in 1982, and Tony Jr. in 2006 — for their first major-league hits. The elder Gwynn’s brother, Chris, also had a 10-year major league career.

SAMMY HAIRSTON JOHNNY HAIRSTON, JERRY HAIRSTON SR. JERRY
(Credit: AP)

SAMMY HAIRSTON
JOHNNY HAIRSTON, JERRY HAIRSTON SR.
JERRY HAIRSTON JR., SCOTT HAIRSTON

The Hairstons are one of three, three-generation MLB families, and the only one featuring five members. Sam and John both played in the major leagues for one season; Jerry Sr. spent most of his career as a backup; and Jerry Jr. and Scott are still active.

RANDY HUNDLEY TODD HUNDLEY Randy Hundley played 14
(Credit: AP)

RANDY HUNDLEY
TODD HUNDLEY

Randy Hundley played 14 years in the majors. Hundley was the Cubs’ starting catcher from 1966-69, winning a Gold Glove in 1967 and earning a trip to the All-Star Game in 1969. Like his father, Todd played catcher with his best years coming with the Mets. Hundley made the All-Star team in 1996 and 1997, hitting a combined 71 home runs in the two seasons. His 41 homers in 1996 are the second most in a single-season by a catcher.

DAVE LAROCHE ADAM LAROCHE, ANDY LAROCHE Dave LaRoche
(Credit: AP)

DAVE LAROCHE
ADAM LAROCHE, ANDY LAROCHE

Dave LaRoche served primarily as a relief pitcher for 14 seasons, posting a 65-58 record and 126 saves. Adam and Andy briefly played together on the Pirates in 2009. Adam has hit at least 20 home runs in six different seasons. Andy has come off the bench for most of his career.

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GARY MATTHEWS SR. GARY MATTHEWS JR. “Sarge” and
(Credit: AP)

GARY MATTHEWS SR.
GARY MATTHEWS JR.

“Sarge” and “Little Sarge” were both All-Star outfielders. The elder Matthews twice finished in the top 20 in MVP voting, including fifth place in 1984 when he led the majors in walks and on-base percentage. Gary Jr. was an All-Star in 2006, hitting .313 with 19 homers and 79 RBIs for the Rangers.

HAL MCRAE BRIAN MCRAE Hal McRae played for
(Credit: AP)

HAL MCRAE
BRIAN MCRAE

Hal McRae played for the Royals and Reds over 19 seasons. He was one the most consistent American League hitters of the 1970s and 1980s, batting at least .270 each season from 1974-1984. McRae made three All-Star teams over that span. Brian began his career with the Royals, the same team Hal finished his with, and had 1,336 career hits.

JOE NIEKRO LANCE NIEKRO One of the best
(Credit: AP)

JOE NIEKRO
LANCE NIEKRO

One of the best knuckleballers of all time, Joe Niekro won 221 games in 22 seasons, and finished in the top five in Cy Young voting in 1979 and 1980. Lance was a part-time first baseman for the San Francisco Giants for four years. Joe’s brother, Phil, won 318 games in 24 seasons, and was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997. The two have the most combined wins (539) of any brothers in MLB history.

TONY PENA TONY PENA Antonio Francesco (Padilla) Pena
(Credit: AP)

TONY PENA
TONY PENA

Antonio Francesco (Padilla) Pena was arguably the best catcher in the NL Central in the 1980s. Playing for the Pirates and Cardinals, Pena made five All-Star teams and won three Gold Gloves from 1982-89. Pena’s older son, Tony, played infield for parts of four seasons for the Braves and Royals. His other son, Francisco, currently playes for the St. Lucie Mets.

TONY PEREZ EDUARDO PEREZ Tony Perez was one
(Credit: AP)

TONY PEREZ
EDUARDO PEREZ

Tony Perez was one of the elite hitters of the 1960s and 1970s, a key cog in the Big Red Machine’s lineup. He hit at least 20 home runs each season from 1969-1975, made seven All-Star teams from 1967-76, and was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2000. Eduardo bounced around the majors as a reserve, playing for six teams in 13 seasons.

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TIM RAINES SR. TIM RAINES JR. Tim “Rock”
(Credit: AP)

TIM RAINES SR.
TIM RAINES JR.

Tim “Rock” Raines was an elite leadoff hitter for the Montreal Expos in the 1980s, the National League’s version of Rickey Henderson. He hit over .300 each season from 1984-87, led the league in stolen bases from 1981-84, and made seven All-Star teams. Raines’ son appeared in 75 games for the Orioles. The two patrolled the outfield together for the Orioles on Oct. 4, 2001, making them the second father-son duo (after the Griffeys) to play in the same outfield.

KEVIN ROMINE ANDREW ROMINE, AUSTIN ROMINE Kevin Romine
(Credit: AP)

KEVIN ROMINE
ANDREW ROMINE, AUSTIN ROMINE

Kevin Romine was a utility outfielder for the Boston Red Sox in the late 1980s and early 1990s. He batted .251 and hit five home runs in 630 career at-bats. Both of Romine’s sons, Andrew and Austin, recently made their MLB debuts; Andrew in 2010, and Austin in 2011.

PETE ROSE SR. PETE ROSE JR. Pete Rose
(Credit: AP)

PETE ROSE SR.
PETE ROSE JR.


Pete Rose is the major leagues’ hit king, accumulating 4,256 hits over 24 seasons. Rose won the Rookie of the Year in 1963, the MVP in 1973 and was named to 17 All-Star teams. However, due to a betting scandal, he is banned from baseball and not in the Hall of Fame. Pete Jr. briefly played for the Reds in 1997. He wore his dad’s No. 14, the only player since Pete Sr. to wear the number.

DIEGO SEGUI DAVID SEGUI Born in Cuba, Diego
(Credit: AP)

DIEGO SEGUI
DAVID SEGUI

Born in Cuba, Diego Segui made his MLB debut in 1962 with the Kansas City Royals. In his final season, Segui threw the first pitch in Mariners history, a 7-0 loss to the Angels on April 6, 1977. David batted .291 and hit 139 home runs in 15 MLB seasons, but part of his legacy is his inclusion in the Mitchell Report, and admission to using anabolic steroids.

GEORGE SISLER DAVE SISLER, DICK SISLER George Sisler,
(Credit: AP)

GEORGE SISLER
DAVE SISLER, DICK SISLER

George Sisler, a Hall of Famer, was one of the great hitters of the early 20th century. He twice hit better than .400, winning the MVP in 1922 after leading the league in average (.420), hits (246), triples (18) and steals (51). Dave pitched for four teams over a seven-year career, and Dick spent eight seasons in the big leagues as a first baseman and outfielder. George was in the stands as a scout for the Dodgers when Dick hit a pennant-clinching home run for the Philadelphia Phillies in 1950.

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MEL STOTTLEMYRE SR. TODD STOTTLEMYRE, MEL STOTTLEMYRE JR.
(Credit: AP)

MEL STOTTLEMYRE SR.
TODD STOTTLEMYRE, MEL STOTTLEMYRE JR.

Mel Sr. was a five-time All-Star pitcher for the Yankees. He won 20 games three times, and finished his career with 164 wins in 11 seasons. Todd made his debut in 1988 for the Blue Jays and won 138 games in 14 seasons. Mel Jr. made 13 appearances for the Royals in 1990.

STEVE SWISHER NICK SWISHER Steve Swisher, a first-round
(Credit: AP)

STEVE SWISHER
NICK SWISHER

Steve Swisher, a first-round draft pick in 1973, was a reserve catcher for most of his career, playing for the Cubs, Cardinals and Padres from 1974-82. Nick was also drafted in the first round, taken 16th overall in 2002. He currently plays outfield for the Yankees, his third MLB team. The younger Swisher was primarily raised by his grandparents, specifically his grandmother. Before each at-bat, Swisher looks toward the sky in centerfield to honor his grandparents.

OZZIE VIRGIL SR. OZZIE VIRGIL JR. Ozzie Virgil
(Credit: AP)

OZZIE VIRGIL SR.
OZZIE VIRGIL JR.

Ozzie Virgil Sr. was the first Dominican-born athlete to play in the majors. He played for five teams over nine seasons, hitting .231 over his career. His son was an All-Star catcher who played for the Phillies, Braves and Blue Jays.

DENNIS WERTH JAYSON WERTH Dennis Werth served as
(Credit: AP)

DENNIS WERTH
JAYSON WERTH

Dennis Werth served as a utility player off the bench for the Yankees and Royals from 1978-82. He hit three career home runs, all for the Yankees in 1980. Dennis’ stepson, Jayson, plays for the Washington Nationals. Jayson hit at least 20 home runs each season from 2008-11. Jayson’s grandfather, Dick Schofield, played infield for seven teams in 19 major league seasons.

MAURY WILLS BUMP WILLS Maury and Bump Wills
(Credit: AP)

MAURY WILLS
BUMP WILLS

Maury and Bump Wills are arguably the second fastest father-son duo ever to play in the majors. Maury stole 586 bases in 14 seasons, leading the league each year from 1960-65. In 1962, Maury stole 104 bases en route to winning the MVP award. Bump stole 196 bases in six MLB seasons, stealing more than 30 bases four times. (Barry and Bobby Bonds totaled 975 career steals.)

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ERIC YOUNG SR. ERIC YOUNG JR. Eric Sr.
(Credit: AP)

ERIC YOUNG SR.
ERIC YOUNG JR.

Eric Sr. spent most of his career as a leadoff hitter. He played in the majors for 15 seasons, appearing on seven different teams. Young made the All-Star team and led the league in steals (53) in 1996. Young’s son made his debut in 2009, three years after Eric Sr.’s final season. Eric Jr. currently plays for the Rockies.

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