Curtis Granderson had contributed to the Dodgers' three-run top of the second inning with a throwing error Monday night, so he figured he might as well do something to make up for it.

So he did, in the form of a two-out, three-run double off the wall in right-centerfield during a four-run bottom of the second, a pivotal moment in the Mets' 13-7 victory over the Dodgers in Game 3 of the NLDS at Citi Field.

"The guys ahead of me ended up getting on base," Granderson said after adding a two-run double in the seventh to give him five RBIs, tying a team record for a postseason game. "They went out and continued to keep their heads held high. It was: Just take it at-bat to at-bat and just look for a pitch to drive.

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"My first at-bat, I didn't have a ton of success against [Brett] Anderson there. I didn't see him that well. But the second time around, hopefully get a ball up in the zone, where you can do something with it."

Did the Grandy Man think the ball had a chance to go over the 380-foot sign for a grand slam?

"When I hit it, I knew I hit it [well], but definitely not that good," he said. "I knew it was toward the center of the field and Kike [Hernandez] out there is pretty fast. So I was just hoping it got down . . . It ended up hitting the wall, which was a good thing for us."

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Granderson now is hitting .545 (6-for-11) in the NLDS.

What has made him so effective?

"I think he's very comfortable," manager Terry Collins said. "I think the fact that Kevin [Long, the hitting coach] is here helps him a lot. They have such a great rapport. He was so happy when we hired Kevin, and I think Kevin keeps him calm. Kevin knows his swing better than anybody.

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"I think if he gets out of whack, he can be fixed in a hurry. He's had a tremendous year, not only on the power front but in getting on base."

Granderson and Long worked together when both were with the Yankees, and Long played a key role in remaking his swing.

Collins said he had no hesitation starting the lefthanded hitter against a lefty pitcher in Anderson. The Dodgers again will go with a lefty, Clayton Kershaw, in Game 4 Tuesday night.

"I know his numbers aren't great against lefthand pitching, but I know one thing: You make a mistake and he can hit one over that fence in a hurry," Collins said. "Or against the fence."