David Wright receives cortisone shot


David Wright of the Mets takes the field for a game against the Atlanta Braves at Citi Field on Thursday, July 10, 2014. Photo Credit: Jim McIsaac

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Mets third baseman David Wright received a cortisone shot Sunday to help ease the lingering soreness in his balky left shoulder. The timing of the injection proved convenient for the Mets, who don't return to action until Friday because of the All-Star break.

"It was planned,'' said Wright, who had two doubles and two RBIs in Sunday's 9-1 win over the Marlins. "They wanted to see how it went these last 10 days. Hopefully, this will help out with the break.''

Wright missed a week with what doctors called a bruised rotator cuff in his non-throwing shoulder. The injury occurred with Wright showing signs of emerging from a slump that defined his first half.

But the hiatus seems to have done more good for Wright, who is hitting .364 (12-for-33) since returning to action July 5.

"I think the rest helped him,'' manager Terry Collins said. "He's starting to swing the bat like we know he can.''

Beginning June 17, Wright has hit .382 (26-for-68) with 15 RBIs in 18 games. He has hits in 17 of his last 19 games.

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Said Wright: "The shoulder is not an issue.''

Good first step

Jonathon Niese (shoulder fatigue) threw his first bullpen session since landing on the disabled list. He emerged with no issues and will throw off a mound again Friday.

With no setbacks, Niese could return to the rotation next Monday in Seattle.

"I was a little rusty at the beginning but I was able to get loose off the mound,'' Niese said. "I was able to cut loose.''

Niese threw 38 pitches, with a break in between to simulate innings during a game.

The Mets will open the second half with Bartolo Colon, Dillon Gee and Zack Wheeler on the mound.

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