One day after collision, Eric Young Jr. is pulled from game with knee discomfort

Eric Young Jr. of the Mets walks to

Eric Young Jr. of the Mets walks to the dugout after his collision at first base with Braves pitcher Tim Hudson (not pictured). (July 24, 2013) (Credit: Jim McIsaac)

After unintentionally stepping on and breaking Tim Hudson's right ankle in a collision at first base Wednesday night against the Braves, Eric Young Jr. was shaken up mentally. But that wasn't the only thing that was hurting him after the play.

Mets manager Terry Collins said before Thursday's game against the Braves that Young "tweaked" his leg on the play. He started the game but was pulled after the third inning with pain in his right knee.

"My adrenaline was still kind of high [Wednesday] and I didn't really experience anything until late last night or early this morning," Young said. "It's just a little discomfort in the lower part of the knee, side of the leg, so we're playing it safe today. They didn't want me to push it because obviously they know I run hard on every play."

According to Collins, Mets players made an effort to check on Hudson after Wednesday's game. "We all sought Tim after the game was over [Wednesday night],'' he said, "and, as the pro he is, the only thing he said was, 'Hey, look, he was only playing hard.' "

Young said he found comfort after the game in seeing Hudson and his wife, Kim, both of whom hold no grudge against him. Kim later thanked Young on Twitter "for playing the game the right way."

Said Young, "I was able to see both of them [Wednesday] night, back here with the doctors and everything, so to see them both, it was very comforting."

Buck starts here

Three weeks ago, John Buck was slumping badly, culminating in an ejection after arguing a strikeout during a pinch-hit appearance on July 4 against the Diamondbacks.

Coincidence or not, he's found his groove at the plate since then. He went 1-for-5 the next day, but in his last 10 games, Buck is batting .368 (14-for-38) with 13 RBIs.

Though he has only one home run during that span, he said he is making better adjustments at the plate to the increased amount of off-speed pitches he's seeing.

"I've just shortened up a little bit," Buck said. "A lot of [my hits] haven't been extra-base hits, they've been singles and just driving in runs. I'm just taking what I'm given."

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