There were millions of people watching on TV when Chase Utley broke Ruben Tejada's right fibula with a hard slide Saturday night.

Only one of them suddenly realized that he probably was going to get called up to replace Tejada on the roster and maybe make his major-league debut in the playoffs.

Matt Reynolds, welcome to The Show. The Big Show.

"I was actually watching the game with all of the guys down in Florida in the hotel lobby," Reynolds said Monday night at Citi Field before Game 3 of the NLDS. "Logan Verrett looked at me and was like, 'Dude, you may be going to New York.' That's when it kind of hit me."

When Utley more than kind of hit Tejada, the Mets suddenly were in need of a shortstop to back up Wilmer Flores. Reynolds was in Port St. Lucie as part of instructional league and also as part of a taxi squad of players who would be somewhat ready to come up if disaster -- or Utley -- struck.

"It's crazy," said Reynolds, who hit .267 with six home runs and 65 RBIs in 115 games for Triple-A Las Vegas. "I'm just excited to be a part of this team and do whatever I can to help win. Honestly, I really don't feel that nervous. I just keep telling myself it's the same game. It's just a bigger stage. It's going to be fun."

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Reynolds, 24, was the Mets' second-round pick in the 2012 draft. If he were to appear in a game, he would be the second player in modern baseball history to make his big-league debut in the postseason. The first was Oakland infielder Mark Kiger, who appeared in two games in the 2006 ALCS but did not get an at-bat.

Kiger, who never again played in the major leagues, spent the 2007 and 2009 seasons in the Mets' minor-league system.

Reynolds last appeared in a minor-league game Sept. 7. He went home to Tulsa, Oklahoma, at the end of the Las Vegas season before reporting to Port St. Lucie.

With Tejada out for the rest of the postseason, Flores will start at shortstop. Though manager Terry Collins said he has confidence in Reynolds, the Mets are unlikely to use him unless it becomes necessary.

"He's a baseball player," Collins said. "At someplace along the line, you've got to enter the big stage. This is a little more difficult than others, but you know what, he's the highest-ranking shortstop we got. So he was the guy we needed to bring here. So if he goes in the game, I'm going to have all the confidence in the world that he can catch the baseball. That's all I want him to do."