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TOM SEAVER, PITCHER Career stats: 311–205, 2.86 ERA (Credit: AP file)

TOM SEAVER, PITCHER
Career stats: 311–205, 2.86 ERA
Mets stats: 198-124, 2.57 ERA
There's a reason they called him "Tom Terrific" and "The Franchise." Seaver was the unquestioned ace of the staff from 1967 until his shocking trade in 1977. He pitched a 10-inning complete game in Game 4 of the 1969 World Series to put the team a heartbeat away from a title. During the 1971 season, he led the majors with a 1.76 ERA in 35 starts and struck out a career-high 289.

He still owns team records for wins (198), ERA (2.57), strikeouts (2,541), complete games and shutouts. He is the only Mets player to have his number retired, and is the only player in Cooperstown who wears a Mets cap on his bust.

Mets Hall of Fame

Take a look at all 24 members of the Mets Hall of Fame and see what made them famous (and infamous).

TOMMIE AGEE, CENTERFIELD Career stats: .255, 130 HRs,
(Credit: AP File Photo)

TOMMIE AGEE, CENTERFIELD
Career stats: .255, 130 HRs, 433 RBI
Mets stats: .262, 82 HR, 265 RBI
Agee played an integral part in the Mets' 1969 championship, making two spectacular catches in World Series Game 3. In addition to those catches, which saved as many as five runs, Agee slugged a leadoff home run in the game. All told, Agee batted .357 with two homers in the series. The Alabama native also slugged what was believed to be the longest home run in Shea Stadium history, a bomb that landed in the upper deck in Section 48 in left field.

GARY CARTER, CATCHER Career stats: .262, 324 HR,
(Credit: Newsday file photo)

GARY CARTER, CATCHER
Career stats: .262, 324 HR, 1225 RBI
Mets stats: .249, 89 HR, 349 RBI
When the Mets acquired Carter from Montreal in 1985, it was the final piece in the 1986 championship puzzle. Carter added a veteran leader alongside Keith Hernandez, helped manage the Mets' young pitching staff, and delivered several clutch hits, including the one that started the two-out, Game 6 rally in the 1986 World Series.

FRANK CASHEN, GENERAL MANAGER Cashen served as Mets
(Credit: AP File Photo)

FRANK CASHEN, GENERAL MANAGER
Cashen served as Mets GM from 1980-90 and was considered the brains behind the 1986 World Series champion Mets. His trades for Howard Johnson, Bob Ojeda, Gary Carter, Keith Hernandez and Ron Darling all played a factor in the team's success in the mid-to-late 1980s.

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DWIGHT GOODEN, PITCHER Career stats: 194-112, 3.51 ERA
(Credit: Newsday / Paul J. Bereswill)

DWIGHT GOODEN, PITCHER
Career stats: 194-112, 3.51 ERA
Mets stats: 157-85, 3.10 ERA
Gooden burst onto the scene in 1984, winning 17 games and leading the majors in strikeouts as a 19-year-old rookie. The following year, he won the NL Cy Young by going 24-4 with a 1.53 ERA. In 1986, he helped the Mets win the World Series. Although Gooden's performance on the field and his behavior off the field were the subject of much scrutiny and the source of disappointment among Mets fans, his status as a fan favorite earned him a spot in the Mets' Hall of Fame in 2010.

JERRY GROTE, CATCHER Career stats: .252, 39 HR,
(Credit: AP File)

JERRY GROTE, CATCHER
Career stats: .252, 39 HR, 404 RBI
Mets stats: .256, 35 HR, 357 RBI
Hall of Famer Johnny Bench once said of Grote, considered one of the best defensive catchers in baseball: "If Grote and me were on the same team, I'd be playing third base." A fierce competitor, he helped shape the Mets' young staff in the late 1960s. He also developed a trademark of rolling the ball to the far side of the pitchers mound after each inning to annoy the opposing pitcher.

BUD HARRELSON, SHORTSTOP Career stats: .236, 7HR, 267
(Credit: AP File Photo)

BUD HARRELSON, SHORTSTOP
Career stats: .236, 7HR, 267 RBI
Mets stats: .234, 6 HR, 242 RBI
Harrelson was the Mets' shortstop for 13 years, and the scrappy anchor of the infield for the 1969 Mets. His most memorable moments as a Met both came in the postseason. In 1973, after taunting the Reds following their Game 2 loss in the NLCS, he got into a benches-clearing brawl with Reds star Pete Rose in Game 3. In 1986, Harrelson can be seen celebrating and running alongside Ray Knight (nearly reaching home plate before him) when Knight scored the winning run on the infamous Bill Buckner play.

KEITH HERNANDEZ, FIRST BASE Career stats: .296, 162
(Credit: AP File Photo)

KEITH HERNANDEZ, FIRST BASE
Career stats: .296, 162 HR, 1071 RBI
Mets stats: .297, 80 HR, 468 RBI
The trade that brought him to Mets from St. Louis in 1983 is widely credited for turning around a floundering organization in the mid-80s. Hernandez brought reliable clutch hitting, Gold Glove fielding, leadership and a fiery attitude that helped the Mets become World Champions in 1986. Now a broadcaster for SNY, an entire generation of Mets fans will remember instead for his love of Tootsie Pops and discussing the finer points of glove maintenance.

One of the franchise's four retired numbers, Gil
(Credit: AP File)

One of the franchise's four retired numbers, Gil Hodges took over the sad-sack Mets in 1968 and led them to a championship in 1969. As a member of the 1962 Mets, he hit the first home run in franchise history.

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CLEON JONES, LEFTFIELD Career stats: .281, 93 HRs,
(Credit: AP File Photo)

CLEON JONES, LEFTFIELD
Career stats: .281, 93 HRs, 524 RBIs
Mets stats: .281, 93 HRs, 521 RBIs
The unquestioned offensive star of the Miracle Mets, Jones batted .429 in the 1969 NLCS and was part of two classic moments during that season. The first came during the second game of a doubleheader on July 30, 1969, when manager Gil Hodges walked from the dugout out to left field to replace Jones, reportedly for failing to hustle (Jones claims Hodges pulled him due to injury).

The second came during Game 5 of the 1969 World Series. Orioles pitcher Dave McNally threw an inside pitch that Jones claimed hit him in the foot. When Hodges produced a ball smudged with shoe polish, the umpire awarded Jones first base. The play helped rally the Mets from a 3-0 deficit to win the game and clinch the World Series. Dave Johnson's fly ball landed in Jones' glove for the final out.

RALPH KINER, BROADCASTER A member of the Mets'
(Credit: AP File photo)

RALPH KINER, BROADCASTER
A member of the Mets' original broadcasting trio, Kiner was a Hall of Fame player with the Pirates, belting 369 home runs in 10 seasons. He joined Bob Murphy and Lindsey Nelson in 1962 and is still contributing to SNY broadcasts. His recounting of stories from the Golden Age of baseball, as well as his trademark name mismatching (he once called Mookie Wilson "Hubie Wilson" and Tim McCarver "Tim MacArthur") make him one of the most beloved figures in team history.

JERRY KOOSMAN, PITCHER Career stats: 222-209, 3.36 ERA
(Credit: AP)

JERRY KOOSMAN, PITCHER
Career stats: 222-209, 3.36 ERA
Mets stats: 140-137, 3.09 ERA
No lefthander has more wins in franchise history than Koosman. He had a 17-9 record and 2.28 ERA during the 1969 Amazin' season, when he first developed a reputation as a clutch pitcher. He won eight of his last nine games during that season to help the team win its first pennant. Then, in the World Series, he won a crucial Game 2 after Tom Seaver had lost Game 1. He also started Game 5, falling behind 3-0 before the Mets rallied for the series-clinching win.

ED KRANEPOOL, FIRST BASE Career/Mets stats: .261, 118
(Credit: AP file photo)

ED KRANEPOOL, FIRST BASE
Career/Mets stats: .261, 118 HRs, 614 RBIs
Kranepool made his debut with the Mets in 1962 at the ripe old age of 17 and spent all 18 of his major league seasons with the team. He still holds many club records, including most games played (1,853), hits (1,418), doubles (225 -- David Wright has 222) and sacrifice flies (55).

TUG MCGRAW, RELIEF PITCHER Career stats: 96–92, 3.14
(Credit: AP file)

TUG MCGRAW, RELIEF PITCHER
Career stats: 96–92, 3.14 ERA
Mets stats: 47-55, 3.17 ERA
McGraw was one of the premier closers in baseball in the late 1960s and early 70s, but his seminal moment came late in the 1973 season, when he told a despairing group of last-place Mets, "Ya gotta believe!" The '73 Mets used Tug's words to carry them all the way to the World Series, cementing McGraw's inspirational legend.

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BOB MURPHY, BROADCASTER Murphy was the voice of
(Credit: Newsday file)

BOB MURPHY, BROADCASTER
Murphy was the voice of the Mets -- and for many the voice of summer -- from the team's birth in 1962 until his death in 2003. His charming baseball aphorisms and catch phrases made him a beloved figure for all New York baseball fans. It's hard to find a Mets fan who doesn't remember the "happy recaps," after Mets wins "puffy, cumulus clouds," over Shea Stadium on a sunny afternoon and pitchers who threw inside on batters trying to "get into his kitchen."

JOHNNY MURPHY, GENERAL MANAGER Murphy was a lifelong
(Credit: AP file )

JOHNNY MURPHY, GENERAL MANAGER
Murphy was a lifelong New Yorker. Though his playing days were with the guys in pinstripes, as pictured above, he’ll always be remembered as being the man who built the 1969 Miracle Mets. He was responsible for hiring Gil Hodges and bringing up some of the best young, talented pitchers of that era, including Tom Seaver, Jerry Koosman and Nolan Ryan.

LINDSEY NELSON, BROADCASTER Part of the Mets' original
(Credit: AP file)

LINDSEY NELSON, BROADCASTER
Part of the Mets' original broadcasting triumvirate, Nelson shared radio and television duties with Ralph Kiner and Bob Murphy until 1979. All three men were inducted into the Mets Hall of Fame in 1984.

JOAN PAYSON, FOUNDER/PRESIDENT Beloved in her time for
(Credit: Newsday File)

JOAN PAYSON, FOUNDER/PRESIDENT
Beloved in her time for her enthusiasm and unbridled love her Mets, Payson was a shareholder in the New York Giants baseaball club. She was one of the few who cast a dissenting vote against their move to San Francisco. When they left town, she sold her shares and began working towards bringing another sports team to New York. She was co-founder and majority owner of the Mets, and served as team president from 1968-1975. She was the first woman to buy a majority stake in an MLB team, rather than inheriting it.

TOM SEAVER, PITCHER Career stats: 311–205, 2.86 ERA
(Credit: AP file)

TOM SEAVER, PITCHER
Career stats: 311–205, 2.86 ERA
Mets stats: 198-124, 2.57 ERA
There's a reason they called him "Tom Terrific" and "The Franchise." Seaver was the unquestioned ace of the staff from 1967 until his shocking trade in 1977. He pitched a 10-inning complete game in Game 4 of the 1969 World Series to put the team a heartbeat away from a title. During the 1971 season, he led the majors with a 1.76 ERA in 35 starts and struck out a career-high 289.

He still owns team records for wins (198), ERA (2.57), strikeouts (2,541), complete games and shutouts. He is the only Mets player to have his number retired, and is the only player in Cooperstown who wears a Mets cap on his bust.

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BILL SHEA, FOUNDER Bill Shea was an attorney
(Credit: AP file photo)

BILL SHEA, FOUNDER
Bill Shea was an attorney and businessman who played a large role in bringing National League baseball back to New York. The original home for the Mets in Flushing had his namesake. Shea also had a hand in bringing the Islanders to Long Island in 1972.

RUSTY STAUB, FIRST BASE Career stats: .279, 292
(Credit: AP file photo)

RUSTY STAUB, FIRST BASE
Career stats: .279, 292 HRs, 1,466 RBIs
Mets stats: .276, 75 HRs, 399 RBIs
Staub had two stints with the Mets, one 1972-75 and another from 1981-85. He's best known for his Game 3 performance against the Reds in the 1973 NLCS when he hit three homers and drove in five runs. He became the first Met ever to reach 100 RBIs in one season when drove in 105 runs in 1975. Later in his career, "Le Grande Orange" became a pinch-hitter extraordinaire.

CASEY STENGEL, MANAGER Stengel was the first manager
(Credit: AP file)

CASEY STENGEL, MANAGER
Stengel was the first manager hired when the Mets were born in 1962. Best known for his charismatic, eccentric double talk and one-liners, Stengel was a sportswriter's best friend. He coined the term "Amazin'" and once famously asked of the awful '62 team, “Can’t anybody play this here game?” Stengel is one of three Mets with his number retired.

DARRYL STRAWBERRY, RIGHTFIELD Career stats: .259, 335 HRs,
(Credit: AP)

DARRYL STRAWBERRY, RIGHTFIELD
Career stats: .259, 335 HRs, 1,000 RBIs
Mets stats: .263, 252 HRs, 733 RBIs
One of the most popular players in Mets history, Strawberry boasted an exciting combination of speed and power that helped the Mets win the 1986 World Series. He joined the exclusive 30-30 club in 1987 and finished second in NL MVP voting in 1988. But like fellow '86 teammate Doc Gooden, he could never stay out of controversy. He once memorably got into a war of words with teammate Wally Backman, saying he wanted to “bust that little redneck in the face.”

GEORGE WEISS, PRESIDENT Like many of the original
(Credit: AP file)

GEORGE WEISS, PRESIDENT
Like many of the original Mets front office members and managers, Weiss was borrowed from another New York baseball team -- the Yankees. After a successful career as general manager of the Pinstripers, Weiss became the first president and general manager of the Mets when they became an expansion team in 1962. It’s rumored that he convinced former Yankees manager Casey Stengel to come out of retirement to manage the Mets. He stayed with the team until 1966.

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MOOKIE WILSON, CENTERFIELD Career stats: .274, 67 HRs,
(Credit: Newsday file)

MOOKIE WILSON, CENTERFIELD
Career stats: .274, 67 HRs, 438 RBIs
Mets stats: .276, 60 HRs, 342 RBIs
After fouling off several two-strike pitches, Wilson hit the “little roller up the first base line” that went behind the bag and behind Bill Buckner to beat the Red Sox in Game 6 of the 1986 World Series. He would have been popular for that moment alone, if he did not also contribute 10 seasons of fine defense, speed and hustle to the Mets.

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