Yoenis Cespedes is making “good progress with his hamstring,” general manager Sandy Alderson said Saturday before the Mets hosted the Marlins. But, this being the Mets, the next word out of Alderson’s mouth was “however.”

“However,” he said, “we’re bringing him up here [from Port St. Lucie]. He will be up here Monday and undergo an evaluation that is a little broader than just the hamstring to try and get to the question of why he may have recurring hamstring injuries. He’s progressing very well with his hamstring, but we want to take a slightly fuller look at him physically to see if there’s something we can do in the way of something preventative.”

Cespedes has been out since April 27, when he re-injured his left hamstring while running the bases. It’s the second straight season he has had a slow-to-heal leg injury that forced him to the disabled list after the Mets tried rest first.

More Montero?

Neither Alderson nor manager Terry Collins would guarantee Rafael Montero a second try at replacing Noah Syndergaard in the rotation after the righthander gave up five runs in 3 2⁄3 innings to the Marlins in the Mets’ 8-7 comeback victory on Friday night.

“We’re looking at that now,” Alderson said. “Looking at what our options are. Obviously, we were disappointed . . . We’re going to have to take a hard look at that spot and make a decision within the next four or five days at the very latest.”

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Alderson said he is looking inside and outside the organization for starting pitchers. He did not rule out making a trade even though teams don’t usually make deals this early.

“Somebody goes on the waiver wire almost every day,” Alderson said. “There are free-agent pitchers who decided not to sign for whatever reason prior to spring training. They’re there. Would they be able to make a contribution in time to make a difference? That’s something that we’d have to consider . . . ”

Veteran pitchers still on the market include Doug Fister, Tim Lincecum and Jake Peavy.

Collins said the prescription for what ails Montero is simple: go after hitters. But the Mets might not give him another chance if they can find someone else to start Wednesday against the Giants.