Let’s put the Oliver Perez situation into the context of your job. You are failing miserably and your boss decides to demote you until your work improves. You decline. Then what happens?

You get fired. But you do not get close to $20 million on your way out. That is the problem that confronts and confounds the Mets with the all-time underachiever on their pitching staff.

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Baseball doesn’t operate in the real world of employment, so the Perez situation is hard for the average person to fathom. The Collective Bargaining Agreement allows Perez to refuse a demotion. That Perez shows no regard for wanting to get regular work in the minors speaks volumes.

But the Mets do have a choice, albeit an expensive one. They can cut their ties and mounting ill will, now from Perez’ own teammates, by letting him go. It was a mistake to sign the erratic pitcher to such a lucrative deal in the first place, to keep him around much longer does a disservice to his teammates.

You think George Steinbrenner would have let money stand in the way of releasing Perez?