The 2015 Mets entered Game 5 of the World Series in the same predicament as the 2000 Mets, who fell to the Yankees, 4-2, at Shea Stadium to lose four games to one.

So they had that in common, at least through four games. But the two most recent Mets pennant-winners were more different than alike, according to the 2000 team's general manager, Steve Phillips.

"They certainly don't have the outfield of Benny Agbayani, Timo Perez and Jay Payton," Phillips said during batting practice. He was joking. "People always joked about our outfield," he said.

Phillips noted that while the current Mets rely on their talented young arms, the 2000 team leaned more on veterans. He mentioned Al Leiter, Mike Hampton, Rick Reed and Bobby Jones. "We were an older team," he said.

So which team would win a seven-game series against the other?

"Oh, the 2000 team would probably sweep them in four," he said jokingly. "No, I'm not biased. But I think it would be fun. It would be a little bit of the young guns against the veteran guns, and I tend to go with the experience there. Al Leiter threw more than 140 pitches in Game 5. That's twice as much as they let some of their starters go now."

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That team's manager, Bobby Valentine, has said the hoopla over the Subway Series somewhat diminished the credit the Mets got for being a pennant- winner, a notion Phillips said has some merit.

"I think in the local market, it's minimized a little bit because you lost to the other team in the market, so I think there is some credence to what Bobby's talking about," he said. "But from my experience, walking through the stadium, people have really fond memories of that 2000 team."

Phillips co-hosts a morning show on SiriusXM Satellite Radio's MLB Network channel. He also traveled for three weeks earlier in the playoffs covering the Blue Jays for the Canadian network TSN. He still is doing reports for TSN from the World Series and also is doing reports for 120 Sports.