Wayne Randazzo had spent most of his life and career in the Chicago area as a reporter, anchor, sports talk host and play-by-play man before being hired by WOR this season as its Mets pregame and postgame radio host.

Now he finds himself covering the Mets' first appearance in the NLCS in nine years . . . against the Cubs.

"It's very bizarre," he said before Game 1. "The Cubs and Mets have never played each other in the postseason, and then for it to happen in my first year here is incredible, the dreamiest of dreams. The thing you don't even think about happening has happened. It's incredible and I'm really glad to be a part of it."

Randazzo, 31, said he has heard more from people in Chicago than New York wondering where his rooting interests are focused, but he insisted, "If there was anything to root for, it was this [matchup].''

When Randazzo visits Wrigley Field for Game 3 Tuesday, it will be his first Cubs playoff game since he attended the famed "Bartman Game" as a 19-year-old fan in the 2003 NLCS.

"It was odd," he said of that night. "I was on the other side of the field. I was in rightfield. You really didn't get the sense it was going to be what it was until Alex Gonzalez dropped the ball at short. Then you knew this was going the other way."

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Then he mentioned the fabled Billy Goat curse. "As the Cubs get closer, that goat gets uglier and meaner," Randazzo said.

When play-by-play man Josh Lewin skipped NLDS Game 3 because of his duties as the San Diego Chargers' announcer, Randazzo filled in.

"It was awesome," he said. "You dream of being a big-league announcer. To call Game 3 of a playoff series and have the moments that I had while I was doing the play-by-play, like the [Yoenis] Cespedes home run, just incredible."

Of working in New York, Randazzo said, "I love New York. I feel like it's Chicago on steroids. That's the best way I can describe it. There are a lot of similarities. New York is much bigger, but I don't feel like I am anywhere different.

"Even with regard to the Mets and the Cubs, there are so many similarities. You have this long-suffering fan base that I think people are in tune with. It doesn't seem like I'm anywhere different, really."