Coming off seven straight road wins in which he led the majors with four home runs and 12 RBIs, Mets centerfielder Yoenis Cespedes was named National League player of the week Monday.

During that stretch, he hit .345 (10-for-29) with an .897 slugging percentage. And that was before he homered against the Marlins on Monday night.

Reaching for superlatives to describe Cespedes' level of play since the Mets traded for him July 31, manager Terry Collins said: "The only guy I could even compare it to closely would be when Barry Bonds would get on a run. In 1994, Jeff Bagwell did similar stuff. But what this guy was doing on the road, every time we needed him to step up, he stepped up."

Recalling a home run Cespedes hit off the Braves' Edwin Jackson on Saturday night, Collins said: "He hit it off the end of the bat and it just kept going. You just shook your head. Matt Harvey walked over to me and he goes, 'Sign him and move him to the next league.' That's the way everybody has looked at it. He's a special talent.''

Cespedes entered Monday night with a .308/.353/.680 slash line, 16 homers and 41 RBIs in 40 games as a Met.

Players buying in

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Collins said the clubhouse reaction to all his lineup juggling has been supportive from players who are used to playing every day.

"It's easier to do it because they understand when guys started to come in here, like Kelly [Johnson] and like Juan [Uribe], we started giving guys days off due to some injuries," Collins said. "Lucas [Duda] was down, Cuddy [Michael Cuddyer] was down. Guys started to fill in. Now that the run's going, everybody is buying into it. There are no issues.''

Extra bases

According to the Elias Sports Bureau, the Mets' 10-7, 10-inning win Sunday in Atlanta marked the first time in franchise history that the Mets trailed by at least three runs with two outs and no runners on base in the ninth inning or later and came back to win . . . The Mets are tied for third in the majors with 37 comeback wins and have 15 since Aug. 1, which leads MLB.