Twice his Royals teammates handed Yordano Ventura early leads in Game 3 of the World Series Friday night at Citi Field.

Twice the 24-year-old failed to hold them, par for the course in what continues to be a rough postseason for the righthander. Ventura, 0-2 with a 6.43 ERA in five 2015 postseason games, failed to get out of the fourth inning in the Royals' 9-3 loss to the Mets.

"I don't feel good at all," Ventura said through his translator, infielder Christian Colon. "I had a chance to put the team 3-0 [in this series] and I didn't do that. But I'll wake up tomorrow ready to cheer on my guys. We're still up 2-1."

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Ventura, who allowed five runs and seven hits, including two-run homers by David Wright and Curtis Granderson, spoke more than confidently about his team.

"I think we can finish it off right here," he said. "There's two more games here and I know we can get it done here."

Ventura did not do that Friday night, departing with one out in the fourth and the Royals trailing 5-3. His final line could have been worse had reliever Danny Duffy not stranded two runners.

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"He just wasn't sharp today," Royals manager Ned Yost said of Ventura. "Fastball velocity was down. It was just one of those days where he just wasn't sharp."

Ventura said he felt "good" and had no explanation for his dip in fastball velocity -- more consistently in the mid-90s instead of his usual high-90s.

"I don't know why my velocity was down," he said. "I think it was more of just commanding my pitches. A lot of pitches were coming back over the middle of the plate."

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After the Royals took a 1-0 lead in the top of the first, Wright launched a 96-mph, belt-high fastball into the seats in left for a 2-1 Mets lead.

Ventura got the lead back with two runs in the top of the second, but Noah Syndergaard led off the third with a single and Granderson followed by lining a 94-mph fastball down the rightfield line for a homer that made it 4-3.

The Mets again got to Ventura in the fourth when Lucas Duda singled and Travis d'Arnaud doubled. Michael Conforto then hit a chopper to first, and when Ventura was slow to cover, the infield single made it 5-3.

"You could tell he was starting to get a little flustered," Yost said of Ventura not covering first. "Started losing his focus and concentration at that point. That's why we made the move."