Rob Manfred, swarmed by reporters at Citi Field on Wednesday, at first was asked about New York baseball and the MLB trade deadline. He joked he was getting off easy.

Then the MLB commissioner fielded questions about Mets pitcher Jenrry Mejia, who was suspended 162 games without pay for testing positive for Stanzolol and Boldenone -- substances that are considered performance-enhancing drugs -- on Tuesday.

It was the second Stanzolol-related suspension for Mejia, who served an 80-game ban that started April 11.

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Asked for his evaluation of the league's drug prevention and treatment program, Manfred said, "Our program I think is the best in professional sports. We say that, [the World Anti-Doping Agency] says it, I think we do a lot of things right.

"Having said that, one of the things we do right is every offseason we sit down with the MLBPA and make adjustments to the program to make sure we're as up to date as we possibly can be . . . and I'm sure after this season we'll sit down and make some adjustments."

Manfred said he came to the ballpark to meet with the Mets front office, unrelated to the Mejia suspension.

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He believes the league is catching the majority of drug-related offenders, but said there is an "underground community that is active in the area of performance-enhancing substances."

"I think our game is cleaner than it's ever been," Manfred said. "I think our testing program is as good as it can possibly be given the available science, and I also am experienced enough in this area to know nothing you do is perfect.

"The use of particular substances ebbs and flows. When you start to see this sort of trend toward a particular substance, it is not surprising that you see multiple players because the same underground community is out there pitching particular substances."

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Manfred added that PEDs will "always be a significant temptation for players" because they can be effective.