Q&A: MLB replay changes

Oakland Athletics manager Bob Melvin, left, argues with Oakland Athletics manager Bob Melvin, left, argues with umpire Angel Hernandez after a review failed to turn a double by Adam Rosales into a home run in the ninth inning of the A's game against the Cleveland Indians in Cleveland. (May 8, 2013) Photo Credit: AP

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WHEN DOES IT TAKE EFFECT?

2014, upon passing a vote

WHAT'S NEW ABOUT IT?

Currently, MLB only uses instant replay to review home runs based on boundary situations or fair-or-foul disputes. Next season, the system will consider 89 percent of a game's plays "reviewable" and subject to a manager's challenge. The other 11 percent, such as balls and strikes, are not.

HOW MANY CHALLENGES WILL MANAGER HAVE?

Three -- one for first six innings and two more from the seventh until the end of the game. If the play is overturned, the manager does not lose a challenge.

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HOW WILL A PLAY BE CHALLENGED?

The manager must give a verbal notification to the closest umpire.

WHO MAKES THE FINAL CALL?

Once a challenge is issued, the plate umpire or crew chief will use a direct line to the MLB Advanced Media offices in lower Manhattan, where an umpire and technician are monitoring that game. The umpire watching the replay will make the call upon review, and inform the on-field umpire of the decision, which is final.

DOES THIS MEAN NO MORE EJECTIONS?

No. While reviewable calls are off limits to debate, the non-reviewable calls can be argued and managers also can ask for help. If the arguing gets out of hand -- as it sometimes has over the past 100 years -- the umpire still can eject a manager or player in such situations.

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