Curtis Granderson would welcome A-Rod back

Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez loosens up before

Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez loosens up before the start of a Class AA baseball game with the Trenton Thunder against the Reading Phillies. (Aug. 2, 2013) (Credit: AP)

SAN DIEGO - Curtis Granderson hopes to have Alex Rodriguez back ASAP, preferably when the Yankees start a series in Granderson's hometown of Chicago on Monday.

"That type of guy . . . is a presence with any lineup he's in," he said Friday. "I know everyone on this team is looking forward to getting him back."

But MLB appears poised to prohibit that from happening. Granderson, the Yankees' MLBPA player representative, said if any player, A-Rod included, has violated the joint drug agreement, he stands behind an ensuing punishment.



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"The way I look at it, whatever the rules happen to be, abide by the rules, and if someone violates the rules, go ahead and take care of it," Granderson said. "But I'm all about innocent until proven guilty."

Granderson said Rodriguez has the full support of the union, though he acknowledged he isn't sure the last time A-Rod spoke with its general counsel, Dave Prouty.

"I've been in talks with Dave Prouty before and I know he had been in talks with Alex," Granderson said. "I don't know what Alex and his team's conversations have been with the union [of late], but as of the last one, which was a month or so ago, everything was fully supporting [him]."

Granderson said there has been talk among players, as well as the union, regarding the unfolding Biogenesis scandal and that he'd like to see some of the language in the joint drug agreement and collective-bargaining agreement "cleaned up."

He said there is some confusion regarding Ryan Braun's 65- game suspension, one in which statements were issued from all sides but with none of them spelling out a specific violation.

"I'm still kind of confused," Granderson said. "As a player, I don't know what the suspension is and I would like to know that just so guys like myself, or other guys, know what they shouldn't be doing. Was it as simple as hey, 'I talked to somebody?' Or was it more than that? No one knows, and I think we eventually need to find that out."

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