Source: Biogenesis founder Anthony Bosch at A-Rod's hearing

Yankees' Alex Rodriguez arrives at the offices of

Yankees' Alex Rodriguez arrives at the offices of Major League Baseball to appeal his 211-game suspension. (Oct. 1, 2013) (Credit: AP)

Alex Rodriguez acknowledged his growing crowd of supporters with handshakes and autographs outside his arbitration hearing at Major League Baseball's Manhattan office Tuesday.

Rodriguez, who did not comment after his eight-hour hearing, is appealing the 211-game suspension issued by the league on Aug. 5 for his alleged connection to Biogenesis, a now-shuttered anti-aging clinic in Miami that allegedly was supplying players with performance-enhancing drugs.

Anthony Bosch, the founder of the clinic, is the league's star witness. Bosch, according to a person familiar with the hearing, was at the league office yesterday.



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Major League Baseball has a suit in Florida in which Bosch is named as a defendant. The suit contends that Bosch and others damaged baseball by providing players with illegal substances.

Bosch reportedly will be dropped from the suit in exchange for his cooperation.

The case is expected to last through this week. Arbitrator Fredric Horowitz will render a decision.

Supporter in incident

Fernando Mateo, the president of Hispanics Across America, said he suffered burns to his chest and neck pain after coffee was thrown in his direction by a security guard outside of MLB's offices.

Mateo was leading about 100 members of his group in support of Rodriguez. According to its website, Hispanics Across America is a New York City-based group devoted to issues facing the Hispanic community.

Police on the scene said they had no knowledge of a police report being filed. Mateo, who refused to give his age, said police told him they would investigate. MLB had no comment.

The security guard, pointed out by members of the group, refused to divulge her name but said security tapes would disclose she was not at fault.

Mateo tried to align one of the barricades, he said, but a security guard objected and the coffee was thrown.

"I was 3 or 4 feet away when she lunged at me," Mateo said in a telephone interview. "If I would have been closer, she would have burned my face."

Mateo, who lives in Westchester, said he was taken by ambulance to NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center, where he was treated and released. The hospital refused comment.

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