Bud Selig OK with MLB's investigators in A-Rod case

Major League Baseball Commissioner Allan 'Bud' Selig attends

Major League Baseball Commissioner Allan 'Bud' Selig attends a 2013 Roberto Clemente Award press conference prior to Game Three of the 2013 World Series. (Oct. 26, 2013) (Credit: Getty Images)

ST. LOUIS - Bud Selig said before Saturday night's World Series Game 3 that he has no issues with the conduct of Major League Baseball's investigative team in the handling of the PED case against Alex Rodriguez, whose lawyers are suing MLB for illegal tactics, including an alleged $5-million payout to top witness Anthony Bosch.

"I'm very comfortable with that," the commissioner said. "Look, I'm not a lawyer in that area. I'm not a lawyer altogether. But our people, I'm very comfortable with what they did and how they did it. I've been in baseball now 50 years and I thought I had seen everything. But apparently I haven't."

That surely was a not-so-veiled reference to the sidewalk circus involving A-Rod's appeal hearing of the past month. Shortly after the proceeding began, Rodriguez's defense team filed a 31-page lawsuit against MLB in New York Supreme Court claiming that he was being targeted by Selig.



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The hearing has been on hold during the World Series but is set to resume Nov. 18.

When approached Saturday at Busch Stadium after presenting the Roberto Clemente Award to Carlos Beltran, Selig initially was reluctant to delve into the A-Rod matter.

"I said months ago that I wasn't going to comment, and I think it's best," Selig said. "There really is a lot of things I could say, but I don't think it would serve anybody's best interest. I'm sorry for what you all have to listen to every day. That's all I'll say."

Even so, Selig couldn't help but circle back to Rodriguez when asked about the state of the game.

"There's always going to be problems," he said. "That's why you got to have a commissioner. The situation in New York is not one you dream about. But the fact is, overall, the sport is doing wonderfully well, by any criteria anybody wants to use."

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