For Alex Rodriguez, it’s been “so far so good” in coming back from his strained right hamstring. The 40-year-old designated hitter, on the disabled list since May 4, did light running in the outfield yesterday for the first time and came through OK.

Joe Girardi said Wednesday he believed A-Rod could return when his 15-day stint is up. “That’s the hope,” Rodriguez said. “But I’ll have a much better answer over the next 48 hours to see how I recover.”

He said he hasn’t felt anything in the hamstring since the day after the injury. He said his most significant hurdle is running, but not straight-out sprinting.

“I would probably say any type of slowing down, then speeding up,” he said. “That’s probably the most challenging part.”

General manager Brian Cashman is cautious. “Our [medical] personnel are encouraged by his progress,” he said, “but it’s too early to call.”

Sanchez coming up?

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With the Yankees facing standout White Sox lefties Chris Sale and Jose Quintana tonight and tomorrow, they are likely to summon a righthanded bat from Tri ple-A. A report out of Scranton last night indicated it will be catching prospect Gary Sanchez.

Outfielder Ben Gamel was sent down, and lefthander Tyler Olson replaced him.

No DL for Ellsbury

Although centerfielder Jacoby Ellsbury sat out a sixth straight game last night with a tight right hip, Cashman said the DL isn’t likely.

“We would have put him down if we thought he needed the DL,” Cashman said. “Every day he’s been improving. Hopefully, this weekend we’ll have full abilities at our disposal.”

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Severino targets No. 1

Winless Luis Severino opposes Sale tonight. The 22-year-old righthander (0-5, 6.12) is coming off an odd performance Sunday. He struck out a season-high nine but allowed three home runs, two to David Ortiz, in a 5-1 loss to the Red Sox.

After Dustin Pedroia’s two-run blast in the first inning, Severino retired 10 straight, seven on strikeouts.

Although opposing teams’ scouts have talked about Severino struggling with his secondary pitches, pitching coach Larry Rothschild said the problems come down mostly to “command of his fastball.”