+-
BRAD STEVENS Butler University to Boston Celtics Stevens (Credit: AP)

BRAD STEVENS
Butler University to Boston Celtics
Stevens was hired by Boston to replace Doc Rivers following Rivers departure for the Los Angeles Clippers. Stevens had plenty of success in his young career at Butler, reaching the NCAA Championship twice and making the tournament in five of six seasons. He amassed a 166-49 record in six years at Butler. |

College coaches to the NBA

Brad Stevens is the most recent coach to make the leap from the college game to the NBA. Stevens was hired from Butler by the Boston Celtics on July 3rd to replace Doc Rivers. Here are other coaches who tried their luck in the pros after runs in the NCAA.

BRAD STEVENS Butler University to Boston Celtics Stevens
(Credit: AP)

BRAD STEVENS
Butler University to Boston Celtics
Stevens was hired by Boston to replace Doc Rivers following Rivers departure for the Los Angeles Clippers. Stevens had plenty of success in his young career at Butler, reaching the NCAA Championship twice and making the tournament in five of six seasons. He amassed a 166-49 record in six years at Butler. |

MIKE MONTGOMERY Stanford University to Golden State Warriors
(Credit: AP, 2006)

MIKE MONTGOMERY
Stanford University to Golden State Warriors
In 2004, Golden State lured Montgomery away from nearby Stanford where Montgomery coached the Cardinal basketball team for 18 seasons. Montgomery's Stanford teams reached the NCAA tournament in his last 10 seasons, but he was unable to translate that success to the NBA. The Warriors finish both the 2004-05 and 2005-06 seasons with 34-48 records and Montgomery was fired before the 2006-07 season. He is now the head coach at Cal, where he has reached the NCAA tournament in four of five seasons. |

LEONARD HAMILTON University of Miami to Washington Wizards
(Credit: AP, 2000)

LEONARD HAMILTON
University of Miami to Washington Wizards
After leading the Miami Hurricanes for a decade, Leonard Hamilton was chosen by Head of Basketball Operations Michael Jordan to coach the Washington Wizards in 2000. Hamilton was a disaster with Washington, finishing his only season with a franchise low 19-63 record. Hamilton was hired in 2002 by Florida State where he is still head coach. |

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISE HERE
LON KRUGER University of Illinois to Atlanta Hawks
(Credit: AP, 2000)

LON KRUGER
University of Illinois to Atlanta Hawks
A Final Four coach at Florida, Kruger was hired away from Illinois to replace Lenny Wilins as coach of the Atlanta Hawks in 2000. Kruger's Hawks were never able to get going, costing him a job after less than three seasons. Kruger was fired in December 2002 with a 69-122 record. He later was an assistant with the Knicks before returning to the college ranks, reviving UNLV as a basketball contender. He recently finished his second season as head coach of the Oklahoma Sooners. |

TIM FLOYD Iowa State to Chicago Bulls After
(Credit: AP, 1999)

TIM FLOYD Iowa State to Chicago Bulls
After the Bulls lost Michael Jordan, Scottie Pippen, Dennis Rodman and Phil Jackson following their 1998 NBA title, Tim Floyd was charged with rebuilding a team with very few pieces left. Floyd was not able to recapture any of Chicago's previous success. Floyd resigned in December of 2001 after a 4-21 start to the season. In four seasons, Floyd's Bulls went 49-190. After leaving Chicago, Floyd coached New Orleans to a 41-41 season in 2003-04, but was not retained. He returned to college coaching at USC where he became embroiled in a scandal involving O.J. Mayo. He is now the head coach at UTEP. |

JOHN CALIPARI UMass to New Jersey Nets One
(Credit: AP, 1996)

JOHN CALIPARI UMass to New Jersey Nets
One season prior to arriving in New Jersey in 1996, Calipari was a coach of the year at UMass. After a rough first season with the Nets, Calipari led his team to a playoff birth in his second year, a first round loss to eventual champion Chicago. Calipari's downfall came the next season when he was fired after a 3-17 start to the 1998-99 season. Calipari rebounded in the college game, coaching a successful Memphis program before starting his current gig at Kentucky in 2009. In Calipari's first four seasons in Kentucky, 17 Wildcats have been drafted. Kentucky also won an NCAA title in 2012. |

P.J. CARLESIMO Seton Hall to Portland Trail Blazers
(Credit: AP, 1996)

P.J. CARLESIMO Seton Hall to Portland Trail Blazers
Before his latest stint coaching the Brooklyn Nets, Carlesimo made his name at Seton Hall, turning around a struggling Pirates basketball program while earning two Big East Coach of the Year honors. Upon arriving in Portland in 1994, Carlesimo achieved moderate success, reaching the playoffs in three straight seasons. He was unable to move the team out of the first round all three years and was subsequently fired. Carlesmio has sinced bounced around the NBA in both head coaching and assistant coaching roles. He most recently served as interim coach for the Nets after Avery Johnson was fired in December 2012. |

RICK PITINO Providence to Knicks; Kentucky to Boston
(Credit: AP, 1987)

RICK PITINO Providence to Knicks; Kentucky to Boston Celtics
Pitino first tried to make the jump to the big leagues in 1987 following a Final Four appearance in his second year at Providence. Pitino took over the Knicks and delivered the team's first division title in nearly two decades in his second season. Pitino decided to leave the NBA for the head coaching job at Kentucky, but after eight seasons and an NCAA title, Pitino returned to the pros with the Boston Celtics in 1997. Pitino was controversial in his time in Boston, clashing with the media while serving as coach. He eventually returned to the college circuit, taking the head coaching job at Louisville, where he won the 2013 NCAA title. |

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISE HERE
LOU CARNESECCA St. John's to N.Y. Nets Carnesecca
(Credit: AP)

LOU CARNESECCA
St. John's to N.Y. Nets
Carnesecca became the Nets third coach in 1970 after starting his coaching career with St. John's. In three seasons with the ABA New York Nets, Carnesecca led the team to moderate success, including an appearance in the ABA Finals. Soon, Carnesecca returned to St. John's where he continued his Hall-of-Fame coaching career. |

BILL FITCH University of Minnesota to Cleveland Cavaliers
(Credit: AP, 1998)

BILL FITCH
University of Minnesota to Cleveland Cavaliers
Before staring a long pro career that included winning an NBA championship with the Boston Celtics, Bill Fitch entered the league through the college ranks with the Minnesota Golden Gophers. After two seasons with Minnesota, Fitch was hired by expansion-team Cleveland as their first head coach in 1970. Fitch coached there until 1980 when he coached Boston to an NBA title. |

BUTCH VAN BREDA KOLFF Princeton to L.A. Lakers
(Credit: AP, 1975)

BUTCH VAN BREDA KOLFF
Princeton to L.A. Lakers
Van Breda Kolff spent most of the 1950-60s in the college ranks, coaching at Lafayette College, Hofstra and Princeton, leading Princeton to a Final Four in 1965. In 1967, he was lured into the pro game by the L.A. Lakers. With L.A., van Breda Kolff coached the likes of Elgin Baylor, Jerry West and Wilt Chamberlain, but resigned after just two seasons due to conflict with Chamberlain. After bouncing around the pros, van Breda Kolff returned to the college game and eventually to Hofstra, where he coached again from 1988-1994. |

JOE LAPCHICK St. John's to Knicks Lapchick, a
(Credit: AP, 1958)

JOE LAPCHICK
St. John's to Knicks
Lapchick, a member of the Original Celtics as a player, was a very successful coach for St. John's starting in 1937, leading the Redmen to two straight NIT titles in 1943-44. In 1947, he declined a steep offer of $12,000 per year to stay at St. John's and left to become the second head coach of the Knicks, who were still playing in the struggling BAA. Despite a winning record and competitive seasons, Lapchick decided to leave the Knicks due to stress management issues in 1956, but soon returned to St. John's where he won two more NIT championships. |

Subscribe to Newsday’s sports newsletter for stories, photos and videos about your favorite New York teams plus national sports news and events.

Comments

Newsday.com now uses Facebook for our comment boards. Please read our guidelines and connect your Facebook account to comment.